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LONDON — Jade Jagger has no doubt about who she’d like to see walking through the door of the new Garrard store on Albemarle Street.

This story first appeared in the September 16, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

“I’d like to see Dr. Dre buy the gun pendant, and Prince Harry buy some gold bracelets,” said Jagger, Garrard’s creative director, with a big smile.

Jagger’s brief was to blend the classic and the avant-garde, which means that blue diamond tiaras sell alongside funky gold dog tags, the rocks on some rings roll — literally — in a see-saw motion and pendants are inspired by hip-hop and heraldry.

One of the more in-your-face pieces is a gun-shaped, diamond-encrusted pendant — the one destined for Dr. Dre — and is made to be worn on a thick gold chain. Upstairs, alongside the more traditional silver, crystal, china and cutlery, there are two Garrard bubble-gum machines filled with little charms. Visitors deposit a $150 Garrard coin and watch the charm — sealed in a little plastic ball — roll their way.

Those charms are by far the least expensive items in the store. Prices start at about $560 for an 18-karat gold pendant from the Mini-Graffiti line.

Jagger took her inspiration for the collection chiefly from the Crown Jewels and worked mostly from books and pictures. Garrard, founded in 1735, was appointed Crown Jeweler by Queen Victoria in 1843. While the company no longer bears that title, it remains the headquarters of the official Crown Jeweler David Thomas.

Thanks to her research, Jagger was able to work several older, unusual elements into her new designs. She took the spinel, a scarlet stone, and used it for tiaras and necklaces. “I’ve always been into spinels, which were used in all the crowns,” said Jagger, the daughter of Mick and Bianca Jagger. “I love their vibrancy; I love the way the light bounces off them.”

She uses Maltese crosses, heraldry symbols and sphere shapes inspired by scepters for the eight jewelry collections at Garrard. She’s also reintroduced blue diamonds, which she uses in the Superstyle collection of pavé diamond pendants and rings.

And clearly the company wants all its customers to feel like royalty. Garrard’s first ad campaign under new owners A&G Group — controlled by Silas Chou and Lawrence Stroll — features celebrities and their personal crests. The campaign features Missy Elliott, Rupert Everett, model Liberty Ross and Jagger and the crests they helped design by filling in a questionnaire. Elliott’s features a microphone, foxes — for a foxy lady — and the Latin phrase Supa Dupa Musca, which translates into Super-Duper Fly. Everett’s includes a rising phoenix, English acorns and leaves, a stag and a wolf. The color campaign was shot by Malcolm Venville and will break in the October issues of magazines including W, Vogue, Harpers & Queen and Tatler. The company declined to say how much it invested in the campaign, but Jagger sees it as another step in the makeover of the venerable house.

“Everything needed updating, and there’s a lot still to expand on,” she said. “But I think we have a solid classic foundation to grow on.”