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Memo Pad: Esquire Gets Galotti … Different Drummer … Get Out the Boxes …

<STRONG>ESQUIRE GETS GALOTTI:</STRONG> Eight months after his abrupt departure from Vanity Fair, Ronald A. Galotti has resurfaced as publishing director of Hearst's Esquire and Esquire Gentleman. Alan Stiles continues as publisher of both titles....

ESQUIRE GETS GALOTTI: Eight months after his abrupt departure from Vanity Fair, Ronald A. Galotti has resurfaced as publishing director of Hearst’s Esquire and Esquire Gentleman. Alan Stiles continues as publisher of both titles. Galotti will oversee ad sales efforts, marketing and the positioning of both titles, as well as the relaunch of Esquire under editor Edward Kosner.

DIFFERENT DRUMMER: Editorial and advertising don’t always live in harmony, and the New York Times is no exception. Fashion doyenne Carrie Donovan was criticized by Times ad salespeople during the flush Eighties for being too exclusive in her coverage in Fashions of the Times, according to a new book, “Behind the Times,” written by Edward Diamond, media columnist for New York magazine. Although the Times had discovered in Fashions of the Times “a new way to print money,” Diamond writes that peace didn’t exist between the ad and news departments.

“The Times advertising sales staff complained that Donovan featured fashions that were ‘elitist,’ ‘fantasy,’ ‘impractical for ordinary people,”‘ he writes. “Worse, from the sales staff’s perspective, FOT concentrated on the same select upper-end designers, principally Yves Saint Laurent, Karl Lagerfeld, Calvin Klein, Chanel and Norma Kamali.”

So, according to Diamond’s book, the two biggest “troublemakers” on the sales staff — who were responsible for selling ads to mass-market manufacturers — were offered and accepted early retirement, while Donovan continued to merrily deliver the upper crust.

GET OUT THE BOXES: It may be January, but there’s some spring cleaning going on at Elle magazine. Two of the magazine’s four senior market editors left this week: accessories editor Suzanne Yalof and editor-at-large Tara Kaplan. Lucy Wallace, most recently senior editor at Harper’s Bazaar, has been named accessories director, and Kaplan’s post will be filled by Victoria Bonomo and Anthony Todd, both current Elle staffers.

TRIPLE PLAY: Richard Avedon has photographed a 26-page advertising portfolio for Neiman Marcus that will appear in the March issue of Harper’s Bazaar. The black-and-white campaign features model Nadja Auermann and shows clothes by 30 top designers. Neiman’s officials wouldn’t comment on the cost of producing and running the portfolio, but sources estimate it to be around $800,000.

NEW AGE: Caroline Miller is caught in something of a time warp. She’s in the middle of moving to her new job as editor of Seventeen from her current post as editor of the decidedly more mature Lear’s. Now, she says she has to focus on her teenage daughter’s generation rather than her own.

On top of that came this week’s news of 35-year-old James Truman’s appointment as editorial director at Conde Nast.

“In one fell swoop, a whole generation of editors suddenly felt old,” said Miller, 41.