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New Bottega Veneta Ads Focus on Craftmanship

MILAN — When Tomas Meier, Bottega Veneta’s creative director, was planning the company’s fall ad campaign, he knew what he didn’t want — the ubiquitous fashion photographer.<br><br>"At first, we approached Irving Penn,...

MILAN — When Tomas Meier, Bottega Veneta’s creative director, was planning the company’s fall ad campaign, he knew what he didn’t want — the ubiquitous fashion photographer.

This story first appeared in the July 5, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

“At first, we approached Irving Penn, but he kindly told us that at this point in his life, he didn’t want to do any more commercials. So I decided to bring someone unknown to the house,” said Meier. The company eventually chose Robin Broadbent, a New York-based British photographer who specializes in still-life beauty.

Labor-intensive craftsmanship and the sculptural feeling of the accessories are the two elements Meier was determined to transmit in the campaign, which breaks in the August Elle and will subsequently run worldwide in fashion magazines, lifestyle books and newspapers, including Vogue, W, Tatler, Vanity Fair, the International Herald Tribune, Madame Figaro and Le Monde. Meier declined to reveal Bottega Veneta’s ad budget for fall.

The four images, slated to run from August through November, feature two shots used in a pair on double-page spreads. The first to break is the vis-à-vis saddle-inspired woven bag, paired with a photo of brown leather strips.

The Accordion boots come with gold metal key chains, dangling off woven leather chords, while the soft red tote with braided handles is shown with sky-high stilettos made with leopard-print satin. For evening, it’s stingray clutches and a close-up of the exotic skin.

“Bottega Veneta is not about a collection but an assortment of items, each with their own life,” said Maier.

“Softness and texture are also key elements. I didn’t want to rush into things because marketing is a key factor,” he said of the campaign, the first he’s overseen since he joined the Gucci-owned luxury goods company a year ago. “Now that pretty much everything has been revised — the packaging, the logo, the store interiors and the sales staff’s uniforms — we felt ready.”