After the critics have spoken, consumers have a chance to weigh in. They cast votes for spring 2005 by visiting the Web pages of designers on Style.com, the site of Vogue and W, which, like WWD, are both part of Advance Publications Inc. For several seasons running the winner has been Marc Jacobs. While the usual suspects are all present and accounted for, one newcomer, Buddhist Punk’s Nick Morely, a London-based designer and favorite of aging rockers, squeaked in at number 19.

  1. MARC JACOBS
    Page views: 1,393,631

    For the third season in a row, Marc Jacobs’ collection had the most page views of any New York designer on Style.com. He featured bow-necked sweaters in ginghams and dots and full, swishing skirts and dresses that WWD pronounced “divine.”

  2. ZAC POSEN
    Page views: 931,702

    Posen, who moved up from number 11 to second place in the rankings, favored hourglass shapes, maritime motifs and showstopping gowns for spring. Some looks were a tad kooky. WWD said one riotous dress “looked like a Missoni gone mad.”

  3. CAROLINA HERRERA
    Page views: 921,258

    Herrera, who was inspired by Forties interiors, used aqua, red and ivory for sweaters, shorts and swimsuits. Silk sundresses and camp shirts were wrapped at the waist and dresses and gowns were decorated with embroidery.

  4. OSCAR DE LA RENTA
    Page views: 914,469

    Oscar de la Renta, whose far-flung travels are often reflected in his clothes, made an ikat with the bold colors of India and featherweight caftans reminiscent of Saint Tropez in the Sixties. De la Renta also embarked on a nautical theme.

  5. RALPH LAUREN
    Page views: 851,355

    Ralph Lauren’s collection for spring, “De-lovely,” was an homage to the refined style of Thirties Hollywood. The glamorous clothes included embellished sweaters, beaded jeans and period accessories, such as diamond brooches.

  6. MARC BY MARC JACOBS
    Page views: 844,804

    WWD found the Marc by Marc Jacobs collection charming and quirky with its long, oversized, printed tank tops, vests and blouses piled on one another. Accessories included diamonds, beaded cloches and a marabou tickler.
  7. MICHAEL KORS
    Page views: 752,578

    Luxe materials such as cashmere, mink and python took a nautical turn in short skirts and sweaters. Clothes ran the gamut from playful to ladylike. WWD particularly liked Kors’ brown jersey dress with a jeweled-illusion neckline.

  8. VERA WANG
    Page views: 742,613

    Wang featured cashmere sweaters and kimono-style jackets in rich brocades. She used the brocade to create skirts — straight, flared and pencil. Wang also whipped up gauzy blouses and ethereal layered skirts.

  9. ANNA SUI
    Page views: 686,377

    Sui’s collection had shades of high-necked Victoriana, the Teddy Roosevelt military and Sacajawea chic. Flirty dresses layered over white petticoats, ruffled jackets, antiqued denim and twill skirts would look right at home on the range.

  10. CALVIN KLEIN
    Page views: 667,299

    Francisco Costa’s collection for Calvin Klein was inspired by the work of Constantin Brancusi. WWD said the jersey dresses and gowns were “the essence of elegance.”

  11. IMITATION OF CHRIST
    Page views: 657,992

    WWD liked a beachy, bobble-trimmed Chloé-inspired cotton dress and jersey dresses with gold and silver paillettes, but said most dresses “looked as if they were fashioned from colored mops.”

  12. PROENZA SCHOULER
    Page views: 637,459

    Proenza Schouler went back to its roots for a collection that brought to mind heiress Gloria Guinness and her fun-loving friends. WWD said the fashions should appeal to a “young and hip crowd that wants jaunty, high-glam looks.”

  13. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG
    Page views: 604,242

    In an effort to expand her repertoire beyond the ubiquitous wrap dress, DVF showed dresses and gypsy skirts in linen and voile. She seemed more confident than ever in her tailored looks.

  14. BCBG MAX AZRIA
    Page views: 601,365

    WWD said the embroidered peasant dresses, vests and folksy coats are better suited to the Broadway production of “Fiddler on the Roof,” but liked the fun cotton dresses in bright, cheery colors.
  15. DONNA KARAN
    Page views: 596,384

    WWD saw hints of Azzedine Alaïa and Helmut Lang in Donna Karan’s collection which featured utilitarian netting and laces in a palette of cool grays and the occasional blast of cobalt and fuchsia.

  16. NARCISO RODRIGUEZ
    Page views: 571,131

    The beaches of Brazil inspired Rodriguez, whose looks included a black stretch scuba T-shirt and shorts. WWD said the designer’s forays into solid color — he usually works with neutral shades — worked beautifully.

  17. TOMMY HILFIGER
    Page views: 552,875

    Hilfiger carried a sailing motif through to sweaters; billowing, printed cotton skirts; crisp shirts, and what WWD dubbed “a delightful Gidget Goes Sexy bikini in turquoise terry cloth trimmed in white.”

  18. BILL BLASS
    Page views: 537,300

    A major improvement, if still a long way to go, was WWD’s assessment of Michael Vollbracht’s spring collection for Bill Blass. Vollbracht mercifully eliminating the “embarrassing kitsch factor of his former shows,” said the paper.

  19. BUDDHIST PUNK
    Page views: 536,948

    London-based Nick Morely held the first runway presentation for his four-year-old label, Buddhist Punk. Morely, who has a strong rock ’n’ roll following, created what he called “his most feminine collection ever.”

  20. KENNETH COLE
    Page views: 472,900

    “If Cole wants to be viewed as an apparel designer of weight, he needs to develop a clear vision rooted in something more compelling than mere clothes, and translate that into the concrete stuff of fashion,” said WWD.

SOURCE: STYLE.COM. THE WEB SITE HAS A MONTHLY READERSHIP OF MORE THAN 900,000. THE AVERAGE AGE OF THE AUDIENCE IS 32, WITH A MEDIAN INCOME OF $68,000; 83 PERCENT OF READERS ARE FEMALE.

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