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On The Drawing Board

SUMMER PLACE: It’s a wonder that this year’s summer pavilion on the lawns of London’s Serpentine Gallery is still standing.<br><br>The white glass-and-aluminum structure, designed by the Tokyo-based architect Toyo Ito and unveiled...

SUMMER PLACE: It’s a wonder that this year’s summer pavilion on the lawns of London’s Serpentine Gallery is still standing.

The white glass-and-aluminum structure, designed by the Tokyo-based architect Toyo Ito and unveiled this month, looks as if it’s missing some pieces. The 61-year-old Ito had only six months to design and build the pavilion, which the Serpentine says must make “innovative use of new and traditional materials” and has to explore “forms of illusions and transparency.”

The pavilion, the third to be commissioned by the gallery, appears to be made up of triangular panels thrown together haphazardly to create a tenuous-looking structure that measures 59.4 feet on each side and 14.9 feet high. But its delicacy is illusory, as Ito, in collaboration with the British engineer Cecil Balmond, determined the placement of its panels by feeding algorithms into a computer.

After housing a program of summer evening events, architectural talks and film screenings, the pavilion — built with more than $150,000 worth of donated production and materials, such as 130 tons of steel from Corus, will be dismantled in September and sold through agent Knight Frank for as much as $225,000.

ACQUIRED ART: Anyone who has ever lived in New York City has learned the fine art of appropriating public space as their own, as in turning a fire escape into a patio or turning the stoop of a brownstone into a parlor. Artists behind “Consuming Places,” an exhibit organized by Creative Time that opens in several Brooklyn locations on Aug. 15, have taken this idea further by creating moveable apartments that can be constructed on stilts over parking lots or turning two Cobra racecars into movie screens.

In one location, New York architectural firm 212box will show a movable glass apartment — with walls made of advertisements — that is designed as a leasable, livable space. Greyworld, a British art collective, has developed custom-made telescopes that can be pointed at specific targets on the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges to trigger personalized voice-mail and e-mail messages. The Cobra racers will also be shown in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, with footage that makes them appear as if they are in motion.

This story first appeared in the July 26, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

SUMMER PLACE: It’s a wonder that this year’s summer pavilion on the lawns of London’s Serpentine Gallery is still standing.

The white glass-and-aluminum structure, designed by the Tokyo-based architect Toyo Ito and unveiled this month, looks as if it’s missing some pieces. The 61-year-old Ito had only six months to design and build the pavilion, which the Serpentine says must make “innovative use of new and traditional materials” and has to explore “forms of illusions and transparency.”

The pavilion, the third to be commissioned by the gallery, appears to be made up of triangular panels thrown together haphazardly to create a tenuous-looking structure that measures 59.4 feet on each side and 14.9 feet high. But its delicacy is illusory, as Ito, in collaboration with the British engineer Cecil Balmond, determined the placement of its panels by feeding algorithms into a computer.

After housing a program of summer evening events, architectural talks and film screenings, the pavilion — built with more than $150,000 worth of donated production and materials, such as 130 tons of steel from Corus, will be dismantled in September and sold through agent Knight Frank for as much as $225,000.

ACQUIRED ART: Anyone who has ever lived in New York City has learned the fine art of appropriating public space as their own, as in turning a fire escape into a patio or turning the stoop of a brownstone into a parlor. Artists behind “Consuming Places,” an exhibit organized by Creative Time that opens in several Brooklyn locations on Aug. 15, have taken this idea further by creating moveable apartments that can be constructed on stilts over parking lots or turning two Cobra racecars into movie screens.

In one location, New York architectural firm 212box will show a movable glass apartment — with walls made of advertisements — that is designed as a leasable, livable space. Greyworld, a British art collective, has developed custom-made telescopes that can be pointed at specific targets on the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges to trigger personalized voice-mail and e-mail messages. The Cobra racers will also be shown in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, with footage that makes them appear as if they are in motion.