WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/pantone-rearranges-its-rainbow-731608/
government-trade
government-trade

Pantone Rearranges Its Rainbow

NEW YORK — Pantone is revamping its 19-year-old Textile Color System. The first change is the name: It’s now called Pantone for fashion and home.<br><br>But the biggest difference, said the company, is that the colors are now arranged...

NEW YORK — Pantone is revamping its 19-year-old Textile Color System. The first change is the name: It’s now called Pantone for fashion and home.

But the biggest difference, said the company, is that the colors are now arranged chromatically. Before, they were organized by groups. So, for instance, a designer looking for that perfect red will find all the reds in one place.

“The ability to search for a particular color within each color family is a key feature,” said Lisa Herbert, executive vice president of Pantone. “Our years of research and customer feedback led to our decision to redesign Pantone for fashion and home in a format that addresses the specific design, sourcing and manufacturing workflows of our clients.”

In addition, the new system contains technical enhancements for greater utility, increased visualization and easier usage. One of the simplest changes is that the binder is now larger and holds bigger cards that feature more tear-out color chips. The company has also improved the consistency in color, whether on paper or cotton.

“All colors in the paper guide and specified publications have been matched to the most current Pantone Textile cotton standards for tighter consistency between both substrates,” she said.

Finally, the new system uses a consistent light source. “We have selected D 65 (daylight) as our primary light source for color evaluation,” said Herbert.

The paper version will be available this month and the cotton version will bow in mid-June. Pricing ranges from $5.75 for a textile color swatch card in cotton to $3,600 for the color swatch files in cotton.

“One of the most important things that we will continue to consider is how our customers use our products,” concluded Herbert. “Their expectations are critical to our product development and evolution.”