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See Dick and Jayne Run

At Dick and Jayne, fashion is a family affair. The contemporary collection is run by Jayne Torres and her daughter Sigrin Torres Aulenta, who want to keep moms and daughters in hip styles.  <BR><BR>Dick and Jayne will be appearing in thegallery,...

At Dick and Jayne, fashion is a family affair. The contemporary collection is run by Jayne Torres and her daughter Sigrin Torres Aulenta, who want to keep moms and daughters in hip styles. 

Dick and Jayne will be appearing in thegallery, a pavilion in the sportswear and dresses category at WWDMAGIC. Joining the brand in thegallery will be others such as Maggie London and Donna Morgan, each of which is looking to pick up new customers and grow sales at the show.

Torres, designer and president of Left Coast Clothing Inc., based in Los Angeles, started Dick and Jayne about seven years ago. Five years ago she was joined by her daughter, who is vice president.

“We like to say that we make clothing and items for young women of any age,” said Aulenta. The Dick and Jayne collection includes apparel, shoes and accessories and pulls in about $1 million in sales annually through 200 active accounts.

Pieces in the contemporary sportswear and dresses line are designed to work together and as single items. 

“It’s not necessarily collection-based,” said Aulenta. “We’re not match-y match-y.”

For spring and summer, the line has some novelty touches like sequins and embroidery and looks include a cotton trenchcoat with piping and a vintage-inspired handprinted shirtwaist dress. The color palette plays off of coral and aqua.

Wholesale prices run from $30 to $60.

“We probably target more of a contemporary misses’ customer, but we are trying to expand out more and reach a younger customer as well,” said Aulenta.

Aulenta said the past few seasons have been great for business. “We’re trying to keep up and really focused,” she explained. To help out, Aulenta’s aunt joined the team, making it a three-woman operation.

“We’re really a strong company trying to grow a little, but not too much,” said Aulenta. “We like it how it is.”

This story first appeared in the February 14, 2005 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.