WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/sidelines-739145/
government-trade
government-trade

Sidelines

BOD STRIKES A POSE: Bod, a New York-based activewear company, is trying to up the fashion quota for yoga fans. <br><br>Designed by Pia Chong, a former strategic marketing and business planning executive, the collection is geared for those who practice...

BOD STRIKES A POSE: Bod, a New York-based activewear company, is trying to up the fashion quota for yoga fans.

Designed by Pia Chong, a former strategic marketing and business planning executive, the collection is geared for those who practice yoga faithfully but want more than burlap pants to strike a pose in. A halter-neck top with raw-edge mesh trim, boy-leg shorts and bootleg pants are among the offerings in the 11-piece collection. Pants are designed not to slip when yoginis do handstands and all items are without tags to help prevent any abrasions. Wholesale prices range from $30 for a top to $50 for pants.

Chong is now using the business knowledge she gleaned from working at RadView Software, Quantum’s Advanced Products Group and Aladdin Systems. Aimed at well-educated, affluent women between the ages of 25 and 44, Bod is offered in shades such as chocolate brown, cobalt and red.

The collection ships to specialty stores next month. First-year projected wholesale volume is $1.5 million, with a 30 percent penetration rate of the targeted stores, Chong said.

NOT BY THE BOOK: Nike executives aren’t jamming up amazon.com to buy novelist Max Barry’s new book, “Jennifer Government,” which describes a fictitious Nike guerrilla marketing campaign gone bad. The opening pages of the book highlight how the sneaker giant sets up a series of shootings at stores selling its new line of sneakers to ramp up some buzz about the brand.

A Nike spokesman said Tuesday, “Mr. Barry is certainly not the first and probably won’t be the last person to use Nike for the sake of publicity or satire. However, while we appreciate his suggestion for a future marketing campaign, having our own employees kill our customers is not in keeping with our brand objectives.”