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On the heels of October market, WWD chats with multiline reps Daryl Deutsch and Carol Perlman.

This story first appeared in the October 10, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Going into the apparel business was a natural career choice for multiline rep Daryl Deutsch, who shows his contemporary lineup at the mart in suites 3E12 and 3F11.

His grandparents owned a millinery company in New York, his mother was a long-time merchandiser for the May Co. and Deutsch has been selling clothes since he was a teenager in high school in Cleveland, Ohio.

Deutsch, a fixture at the mart since 1977, has a new partner, Carol Perlman, whose mission is to impart trend and merchandising knowledge to stores and bolster the showroom’s road presence across the Southwest.

The duo’s label lineup includes Softwear by Mark Singer, Barbara Lesser, Fibers by Barbara Lesser, 6 Degrees, Caba and Therapy.

WWD caught up with Deutsch and Perlman as they prepared for October market:

WWD: Carol, what’s your background and how will it benefit retailers?

C.P.: Before joining Daryl, I was a buyer for 10 years with Accente, the Houston-based specialty chain that is now closed. Before that I worked at the mart with Neil and Lois Goldblatt and I also was a rep for Swatch.

I have a buyers’ perspective, and I’m going to help our accounts better utilize their budgets and merchandising visions.

WWD: Daryl, how are you helping stores grow their businesses?

D.D.: Our showroom has the same goal as stores: to sell clothing and make money. Wholesaling is now a 365-day-a- year business. There are no more down times. We’re here or on the road every week. We’re making our showroom more like a store and bringing in new lines that address different aspects of the misses’ customers’ lifestyles.

WWD: Is the slower pace of regional markets going to hurt your sales this year?

D.D.: We’re planning on having gains of 20 percent this year. There’s no doubt though that shows are slower and that fewer stores are coming to market. I strongly believe that stores need to attend five markets a year to keep their hands on the pulse of fashion, but if they can’t come to market we’ll take the lines to them.

WWD: What could improve attendance and build sales at the mart?

D.D.: I’d really like to see the apparel mart vendors move en masse to the World Trade Center down the road. There would be so much positive synergy flowing between the gift, home furnishings and apparel vendors.

WWD: What trends are important for spring?

C.P.: Bright colors, shades of white, lace and novelty trims on tops and lots of prints, from florals and animals to modern graphics.