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The Zanella Factor

Never heard of Zanella? If Armando DiNatale (Zanella’s owner, ceo, president and creative director) has anything to do with it, that’s all about to change. The nearly 50-year-old Italian company, best known for its luxury menswear, pants in...

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JOHN AQUINO, GEORGE CHINSEE, STEVE EICHNER, KYLE ERICKSEN, GIOVANNI GIANNONI, THOMAS IANNACCONE, ROBERT MITRA AND DAVID TURNER

Never heard of Zanella? If Armando DiNatale (Zanella’s owner, ceo, president and creative director) has anything to do with it, that’s all about to change. The nearly 50-year-old Italian company, best known for its luxury menswear, pants in particular, has been slowly expanding its women’s line for a decade without the benefit of advertising and promotion. Now, however, it’s primed to become a household name, and the firm spared no expense for its fall presentation at its Fifth Avenue showroom. After all, Carmen Kass, Stella Tennant, and Bridget Hall don’t come cheap if your name’s not Marc Jacobs.

This story first appeared in the February 11, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The collection, which was predominantly daytime, revealed its haberdashery origins with tailored overcoats, suits, skirts and trousers in traditional wool herringbone, glen plaid and houndstooth. Despite some conservative, even matronly elements, there were several chic highs, including a beautifully-cut belted trench in navy, as well as a series of lavender knits. The only major misstep was a group of metallics at the end — a hooded sweater with a touch of sparkle isn’t the most stylish way to go casual for evening.