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Third Big Drop Lands in SoHo

NEW YORK -- Big Drop is staking another claim in SoHo. Not to be outdone by fellow specialty shops like Scoop and Olive & Bette's moving in on its turf, Big Drop opened its third boutique, at 425 West Broadway, just around the corner from its...

NEW YORK — Big Drop is staking another claim in SoHo. Not to be outdone by fellow specialty shops like Scoop and Olive & Bette’s moving in on its turf, Big Drop opened its third boutique, at 425 West Broadway, just around the corner from its existing shop on Spring Street.

While the proximity might seem curious, owner David Katzav is merely looking to keep the competition at bay in “his” neighborhood, where he has been a retailer since 1990.

“You see what is happening in SoHo. Other shops have moved in.They’re closing in on us,” said Katzav. “We had to grow in order to save our business.”

Big Drop has created a niche over the years with its clever mix of up-and-coming designer labels and trendy staple pieces. A second Big Drop store opened uptown at 1321 Third Avenue at 76th Street three years ago.

The new 1,500-square-foot outpost has a spacious feel with a glass facade, epoxied cement floors and modern fixtures in stainless steel. The back of the store is painted in blocks of candy pink, chartreuse and fuchsia and is offset by large mirrors that customers can doodle on — adding a playful feeling to the space.

The store carries such designers as Development, Plenty, Martin and, of course, a vast inventory of Seven jeans. Accessories fill out the product mix with brands like Tru Tru, Noir, Anja Flint and Jest.

The smaller, 1,200-square-foot Spring Street boutique will remain open as an incubator of sorts for nascent labels. “The other store will be more of a testing ground for new designers,” said Katzav.

But Katzav said he would continue to tweak the merchandise at both stores according to shoppers’ feedback. “We don’t want to confuse our customers,” he said.

Prices range from $150 to $300 for pants, $120 to $250 for blouses and $150 to $400 for knits.

Katzav estimates first-year sales will be in the range of $2 million to $2.5 million — approximately 20 percent more than its neighboring Spring Street shop.”