Adam Lippes showed at the Rush Charity Fashion Show


FASHION CONNECTION: Adam Lippes knows the importance of face time. So for the 90th anniversary of the Rush Woman’s Board Fashion Show last Thursday at the United Club at Soldier Field in Chicago, the designer not only hand-selected 10 resort looks from his collection for the runway presentation, he attended the event as well.

“We have some great customers in Chicago who asked if we could do it and if I would come to the show,” Lippes said after finishing a trunk show and personal appearance at Neapolitan Collection in Winnetka. “It’s great exposure. This whole idea of trying to give back in different ways is really important. Rush is the best hospital in the [Chicago] area so it was a no-brainer. I heard that it’s also the longest running [charity] fashion show.”

The looks the designer picked for the show represented a “highly edited sample of resort with the idea that it’s available now,” he noted. “Meeting all of these customers that I do, what I keep hearing is ‘you’re making luxury clothes that I can wear, these are clothes that I live in,’” said Lippes, who does about 10 personal appearances a year. In addition to Chicago, strong markets for the designer include San Francisco and southern California, Houston, Dallas, Miami, Aspen and of course, New York. “It’s the opposite of special occasion. It’s prints or embroidery or color. It’s not basic. That seems to be what they like.”

About 780 guests attended the Rush Fashion Show, which also featured looks from designers like Ralph Lauren, Jil Sander and CH Carolina Herrera. The charity event raised more than $500,000 for The Road Home Program, which helps veterans transition to civilian life. “Rush is one of four anchor hospitals in the U.S. that are part of the program that provides mental health care for veterans and their families,” said Anne Tucker, co-chair of the Rush Fashion Show, adding that the Woman’s Board of Rush University Medical Center has raised more than $32 million for various causes over the last few decades.

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