"Opéra Pompidou" live performance by Francesco Vezzoli.


MILAN — Prada partnered with Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli for the production of 12 costumes featured in the “Opéra Pompidou” live performance, which was hosted on Thursday evening at the Centre Pompidou museum in Paris.

Named “Carte Blanche à Francesco Vezzoli,” the artistic soirée consisted in a Vezzoli takeover of the so-called “Beaubourg” aimed to celebrate the museum’s 40th anniversary.

As part of his takeover, Vezzoli staged the “Opéra Pompidou” live performance, during which 12 singers reinterpreted the museum’s modern and contemporary art pieces.

"Opéra Pompidou" live performance by Francesco Vezzoli.

“Opéra Pompidou” live performance by Francesco Vezzoli.  Courtesy Photo

“The singers of ‘Opéra Pompidou’ sing about their love to subjects painted by the greatest masters in the history of art,” Vezzoli said. According to the artist, the operation was “as if the hands of the clock had moved back in time and tonight Marchesa Casati and Niki de Saint Phalle wanted to wear their most audacious clothes and seduce all of the men, even the most reserved.”

The bold Prada clothes were featured on an Arlequin singing Neapolitan traditional anthem “’O sole mio” in front of Henri Matisse’s “Luxe, calme et volupté” wearing a colorful handmade sweater of the brand’s fall 2017 collection; on singer Jeanne Ireland playing the Marquise Luisa Casati in a black fall 2007 coat covered with paillettes and on singer Farrah El Dibany performing in front of Pablo Picasso’s “Arlequin” wearing a resort 2008-inspired dress embellished with yellow flowers, among others.

"Opéra Pompidou" live performance by Francesco Vezzoli.

“Opéra Pompidou” live performance by Francesco Vezzoli.  Courtesy Photo

This is not the first time the fashion house collaborates with Vezzoli. In addition to being a longtime friend of the brand and attending several of its fashion shows, last May the artist staged an exhibition named “TV 70 Francesco Vezzoli Guarda la RAI [watches national television]” at the Fondazione Prada in Milan. With the installation, Vezzoli contended that Italy’s’ public broadcasting company was the main industry for Italian culture and mirrored the country’s social and cultural changes from political radicalness of 1968 to the hedonism of the Eighties.

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