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Martin Kramer Becomes President of Trimfit

That role was previously handled by his older brother Arnold Jr., who died at the end of August, at age 87.

Martin Kramer, chairman and chief executive officer of Trimfit, has taken on the responsibilities of president.

That role was previously handled by his older brother Arnold Jr., who died at the end of August, at age 87.

The elder Kramer spent his entire career — more than 50 years — working at Trimfit, a hosiery company that his father and two uncles started in 1921. Kramer’s grandmother used money she had earned from running a dry goods department store in the Bronx to help the trio get their business up and running.

Based in Philadelphia, where the company has design offices, Arnold Kramer worked up until the time of his death, his brother said. “He was an absolute workaholic. Every day he would be in the office at 7:30, and he wouldn’t leave until after 6:00 at night,” he said.

As for how his brother took to friends’ suggestions later in life that he ease up a bit, Martin Kramer said, “He would brush them off. He kept doing his thing.”

At its peak in the Fifties and Sixties, Trimfit was a $42 million business that employed 380 people in its Philadelphia headquarters, New York sales office and manufacturing facilities in the Carolinas. In the Sixties, Arnold Kramer lived in Toronto for a stretch, overseeing the legwear maker’s Canadian division. As more production has moved offshore to the Philippines and South Korea, the company now has 165 employees, including those in two manufacturing facilities in Thomasville, N.C. Earlier this year, Trimfit relocated its New York office to 463 Seventh Avenue from West 34th Street.

After attending the Hill School and then graduating from Dartmouth College, Arnold Kramer served as a captain in the 11th Airborne paratroopers in World War II. A three-sport varsity high school athlete, Kramer was at one time a nationally ranked junior tennis player. As captain of the tennis team at the Hill School and Dartmouth, he encouraged teammates to “spread the word that he was first cousins with Jack Kramer, who was the leading player in the world at that time. He was of no relation, but Martin said it anyway,” Arnold Kramer said.

A supporter and interviewer for his alma mater, Kramer also supported the American Red Cross and the Kiwanis Club, and was an officer with the National Hosiery Institute. In addition to his brother, Kramer is survived by his wife, Christa; two sons, Richard and William; a daughter, Ellen Kramer-Keyser, and a sister, Judith Goodkind Kramer.