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Obit: Jimmy Moore, Fragments Jewelry Co-Founder

Jimmy Moore, co-founder of the New York-based Fragments jewelry store and showroom, died Friday at his home in Leachburg, Pa. He was 61.

Jimmy Moore, co-founder of the New York-based Fragments jewelry store and showroom, died Friday at his home in Leachburg, Pa. He was 61.

This story first appeared in the July 31, 2009 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The cause of death was bile duct cancer, said Janet Goldman, co-founder of Fragments.

Moore was known as a nurturing figure who represented bright talent in the fine and fashion jewelry markets, such as Chan Luu and Gurhan.

With long blonde hair, blue eyes and a penchant for cowboy boots and arm loads of bracelets, Moore “was a mixture of runway, country and always rock ’n’ roll,” Goldman said. “He had such a passion for what we were doing, for finding jewelry. It wasn’t just research to him, he just did it and it made him happy. His passion for jewelry and fashion was contagious.”

Moore was born in Leachburg and graduated from the Art Institute in Pittsburgh before moving to Atlanta, where he began his career doing window displays, sales and buying for Comes the Sun, a clothing store. He moved to San Francisco, where worked as the buyer and director for Glassware Leathers, a trend-driven store offering hip leather jackets and cowboy boots.

In the early Eighties, Moore moved to New York, where he represented costume jewelry designers such as Wendy Gell. In 1984, he was introduced to Goldman, then a clothing designer, and after one meeting told her, “We have good karma.” Goldman described their partnership as “serendipitous.” They worked together for 17 years, setting up the Fragments showroom on Broome Street in lower Manhattan and opening its first retail outpost on nearby Greene Street. The store moved to Prince Street in 2002 and sells jewelry by more than 30 designers, including Mallory Marks, Jeanine Payer and Dana Kellin.

“He believed in people before they believed in themselves,” Goldman said. “He influenced buyers, stylists and loved to find the best in people. He never carried a grudge, never held onto anger. He was a gentle, spiritual soul with a powerful personality.”

Moore is survived by his mother, Marge Lingerfelter, and two sisters, Doreen Bonner and Lynette Israel. A memorial service for Moore is planned for 6 p.m. on Aug. 6 at the Community Church of New York, 40 East 35th Street.