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In Translation

French actresses are hot right now... Joining them is Clemence Poesy, a wisp of a girl who could be their little sister.

French actresses are hot right now — see Marion Cotillard, whose virtuoso performance in “La Vie en Rose” garnered her an Oscar nomination and Bond girl Eva Green, who was just in “The Golden Compass” and soon plays opposite Ryan Phillippe in “Franklyn.” Joining them is Clémence Poésy, a wisp of a girl who could be their little sister.

The 25-year-old Parisian, best known to Stateside audiences as Fleur Delacour from 2005’s “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” has returned to American Cineplexes in a more adult role: as Chloë, Colin Farrell’s love interest in Martin McDonagh’s “In Bruges.” And though her elfin features might belie it, Poésy can more than hold her own next to the Irish scenery-eater.

“He’s not like this guy who comes in with his superstar status,” says the bilingual Poésy. “It was a collaboration.” She’s certainly not some green starlet — her father is a theater director and Poésy began acting professionally in high school before studying theater in university at Nanterre.

She’s no slouch next to models, either: Poésy is currently in the ads for fashion house Chloé’s fragrance, regularly sits front row at Chanel and Balenciaga and has worked with photographers like Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Paolo Roversi and Ellen von Unwerth. Fashion “is something I’ve always been interested in,” she says, and she’s discovered a big advantage to modeling over acting. “It’s great — one portrait and you are done.”

Her off-set style is artfully undone — today, she dons Cheap Monday jeans, vintage boots, a T-shirt from a favorite New York store, Eleven, topped off with a Balenciaga jacket. “But I don’t usually get Balenciaga,” she says, laughing. “I like being comfortable. I am uncomfortable in clothes that are overly sexy.”

In fact, unlike many of her Hollywood peers, Poésy is very low-key all around. She visits museums, not nightclubs. She isn’t jaded by red-carpet premieres and doesn’t dream of forsaking her Marais apartment in Paris for Los Angeles, though she plans to continue alternating French and American productions. “I like the balance,” she says.