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Memo Pad

DUTCH FUSS: Will Dutch survive without Sandor Lubbe? A spokesman for Audax, which owns 60 percent of Art View — the publisher of Dutch — said Audax and Lubbe are currently in discussions about the future ownership of the über-hip...

DUTCH FUSS: Will Dutch survive without Sandor Lubbe? A spokesman for Audax, which owns 60 percent of Art View — the publisher of Dutch — said Audax and Lubbe are currently in discussions about the future ownership of the über-hip fashion and design title. As reported, Lubbe resigned as editor in chief and publisher of Dutch earlier this month, but he still holds a 40 percent stake in Art View. “The future of Dutch depends entirely on the outcome of those discussions,” the spokesman said, adding however that it’s unlikely the September issue will come out. To make matters even more complicated, Lubbe is about to launch a magazine called Berlin — and that may spell death for Dutch. “We would like to go ahead with Dutch, and we have the sufficient advertising income and the structure to do so. The question, however, remains as to whether Lubbe will lure advertisers away from Dutch to Berlin,” said the Audax spokesman. The spokesman also said his company is looking into whether Lubbe used resources from Dutch to fund Berlin. “The Berlin project came as a total surprise to us. It is not an Art View activity. It is possible that this could have happened. Just take a look at the media packs being sent to Berlin advertisers. Some of the sample pages of Berlin are identical to ones that have already appeared in Dutch,” he added. Lubbe did not return phone calls seeking comment. Meanwhile, according to sources in London, the first issue of Berlin — all 300-400 pages of it — is due out in September and will include a photo shoot by Steven Klein. Starting next year, the German-language fashion and lifestyle magazine will publish four times a year with a target circulation of 160,000. Meanwhile, Gear publisher Bob Guccione, Jr., told WWD that he has not spoken to Lubbe recently, but that Dutch’s current financial straits have not squelched his interest in the magazine. “I remain interested in publishing Dutch USA in 2003, no matter what state it’s in – even defunct,” he said.

SEVENTEEN SHEDS MORE PEOPLE: As rumors continue to fly about the imminent departure of Annemarie Iverson, editor in chief of Seventeen, staffers continue to run for the doors. This week was marked by the resignation of Tamara Glenny, who is the second of the magazine’s two deputy editors to quit in recent weeks. Glenny is headed off to YM, where she will become executive editor.

ELLE’S NEW MAN: Is it payback time for Kevin Hand, who resigned under a cloud last year as chief executive of Emap? Hand, who was widely blamed for Emap’s disastrous acquisition of the U.S. magazine group Petersen, has been named chairman of the freshly minted Hachette U.K. That company was formed earlier this month when Hachette Filipacchi Medias, the French media giant — and Emap rival — bought Attic Futura, the U.K.-based publisher of teen and entertainment titles, for an estimated $56 million. Attic Futura’s titles include Sugar, Inside Soap and tvhits! Hachette has made no secret of wanting to snatch back Elle, Elle Girl and Elle Decoration from Emap, which publishes the titles in the U.K. under license. In a statement announcing the acquisition of Attic Futura, Hachette said it was determined to reinforce its position in the U.K., and especially in the teen and entertainment market segments. Hachette said it’s convinced there are “synergies to be achieved between Attic’s titles and the Hachette titles (Elle, Elle Decoration, and Elle Girl).” In a separate statement, Emap indicated it was bracing itself to lose the Elle titles. An Emap spokesman declined to comment on the fate of New Woman and Red, which are also published under license by Emap. Sources, however, said Emap was confident it would be able to retain those titles.

LOCKWOOD TO WALLPAPER: Christopher Lockwood, a veteran of the London-based Dazed Group, has been named publisher of Wallpaper. Wallpaper parent IPC Media, a division of Time Inc., said Lockwood would start on Sept. 16 and report to Richard Johnstone, publishing director of Wallpaper. Lockwood was formerly group advertising director for Dazed & Confused, Intersection and Another Magazine. His appointment leaves no doubt that Wallpaper wants to woo those fashion companies more than ever. “[Christopher] has a great track record within the international luxury-brand advertising and fashion markets,” Johnstone said in a statement. Meanwhile, a spokeswoman for IPC said the company was still hunting for Wallpaper’s next editorial director. The latest name to surface in London has been that of Iain R. Webb, currently fashion director of British Elle. Webb couldn’t be reached for comment.

ELLE’S NEW MAN: Is it payback time for Kevin Hand, who resigned under a cloud last year as chief executive of Emap? Hand, who was widely blamed for Emap’s disastrous acquisition of the U.S. magazine group Petersen, has been named chairman of the freshly minted Hachette U.K. That company was formed earlier this month when Hachette Filipacchi Medias, the French media giant — and Emap rival — bought Attic Futura, the U.K.-based publisher of teen and entertainment titles, for an estimated $56 million. Attic Futura’s titles include Sugar, Inside Soap and tvhits! Hachette has made no secret of wanting to snatch back Elle, Elle Girl and Elle Decoration from Emap, which publishes the titles in the U.K. under license. In a statement announcing the acquisition of Attic Futura, Hachette said it was determined to reinforce its position in the U.K., and especially in the teen and entertainment market segments. Hachette said it’s convinced there are “synergies to be achieved between Attic’s titles and the Hachette titles (Elle, Elle Decoration, and Elle Girl).” In a separate statement, Emap indicated it was bracing itself to lose the Elle titles. An Emap spokesman declined to comment on the fate of New Woman and Red, which are also published under license by Emap. Sources, however, said Emap was confident it would be able to retain those titles.

LOCKWOOD TO WALLPAPER: Christopher Lockwood, a veteran of the London-based Dazed Group, has been named publisher of Wallpaper. Wallpaper parent IPC Media, a division of Time Inc., said Lockwood would start on Sept. 16 and report to Richard Johnstone, publishing director of Wallpaper. Lockwood was formerly group advertising director for Dazed & Confused, Intersection and Another Magazine. His appointment leaves no doubt that Wallpaper wants to woo those fashion companies more than ever. “[Christopher] has a great track record within the international luxury-brand advertising and fashion markets,” Johnstone said in a statement. Meanwhile, a spokeswoman for IPC said the company was still hunting for Wallpaper’s next editorial director. The latest name to surface in London has been that of Iain R. Webb, currently fashion director of British Elle. Webb couldn’t be reached for comment.