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WHO’S WEARING GAP? Looking for a much-needed turnaround in back-to-school sales, Gap is turning up the star wattage. As part of Trey Laird’s first campaign for the company, a 48-page onsert was created featuring a variety of celebrities...

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Lauren Hutton and Bridget Hall in a spread in a48-page Gap onsert for Vanity Fair.

WWD Staff

WHO’S WEARING GAP? Looking for a much-needed turnaround in back-to-school sales, Gap is turning up the star wattage. As part of Trey Laird’s first campaign for the company, a 48-page onsert was created featuring a variety of celebrities wearing Gap clothing. The onsert will be polybagged with the September Vanity Fair.

Shot by Mikael Janssen, the onsert shows such celebrities as Willie Nelson, Kelly Klein, Salma Hayek, Peter Lindbergh (who shot Gap’s fall TV campaign), Polly Mellen, Alec Wek, Jason Patric, Sissy Spacek and Bridget Hall bringing their personal style to Gap jeans, denim jackets, T-shirts and shirts. The shots are reminiscent of Gap’s iconic ads of the Eighties, which put the retailer on the fashion map. The onsert, which sources estimate cost Gap about $1.1 million, carries the tag line, “For every generation Gap.”

The September VF, which is its largest September issue in its history, carries 284 ad pages.

SANDOR UPDATE: Sandor Lubbe, editor in chief and publisher of Dutch, told friends this week he resigned from the magazine. His departure raises the question of what will become of Dutch, which is 60 percent owned by Audax Media and 40 percent owned by Lubbe. Sources claimed photographers haven’t been paid and there appears to be growing dissatisfaction at the magazine, where expenses haven’t been reimbursed either. The September issue is said to be packed with fashion advertising, but whether the magazine plans to charge ahead this fall remains unclear. Meanwhile, Lubbe is busy putting together a new magazine called Berlin, which he’s financing and which debuts in October.

MOVING ON: The changes continue at Rolling Stone. Just days after fashion director Patti O’Brien resigned and photo editors Fiona McDonaugh and Audrey Landbeth were driven out, the magazine also lost Siung Tjia, who has been deputy art director for the last four years. Tjia’s departure more or less signals the end of the old Rolling Stone regime from a visual standpoint. Its current art director, Andy Cowles, was hired late last year shortly before owner and editor in chief Jann Wenner announced that he would be replacing managing editor Robert Love, eventually hiring Ed Needham. Reached by phone, Tjia declined to comment on his plans or the reasons for his departure. The company is seeking applicants through a listing on mediabistro.com.

LIVE NUDE GIRL: ‘Stunt journalism’ is in full swing these days. Leave it to Marie Claire, the same magazine that put “guest editor” Gwyneth Paltrow on a remote desert island, to come up with this stunt in its September issue: painting fake clothing on nude ‘aspiring model’ Christina Perrine (aren’t actual models ever available for these gigs?) and then unleashing her on the night streets of Manhattan. Marie Claire recruited body-paint artist Joanne Gair (who crafted the “suit” on nude Demi Moore for the famous 1992 Vanity Fair cover) to do the honors. The article recounts Perrine’s 13-hour makeover, during which time she passed out from malnutrition while the body-paint artists continued their work. She then hit the nightclub Spa (presumably after being fed), where titillated, lecherous club creatures proposed to her and/or tried to cop a quick feel. While the reactions Perrine’s ‘outfit’ elicited from passersby seem somewhat engineered by the article’s author, Ty Wenger, it’s still a must-read for such excellent moments as the ever-hungry Perrine’s attempt to order food at McDonald’s at 4 a.m. “Even when you’re naked, you still can’t get someone to take your order at Mickey D’s,” she lamented.

Meanwhile, in the August GQ, Pygmalion editor-in-chief Art Cooper commissioned writer Jim Nelson to create faux celebutantes “the Marriot sisters,” not knowing that the two aspiring models he transformed into trust-fund kids have since assimilated all the attributes of the sin-drenched celebrity underworld, including binge drinking and 6 a.m. cell phone calls to W staffers who they now consider to be their “friends.” Is it fun playing God, Art?

DIESEL TO DIESEL — NO FREE CLOTHING: Vin Diesel may be fetching $10 million a movie these days, and his forthcoming action flick “XXX” is expected to be a blockbuster, but the muscle-bound leading man has known leaner times. A former employee of apparel chain Diesel claims Vin and his publicist used to bug the ever-hip retailer for free clothing. “He used to call and say ‘I should do Diesel because I’m Vin Diesel, and it would be like free advertising for both of us,” said the former staffer. “My reaction was ‘Nice try, but I don’t know who the hell you are.’ This was just before he got that role in “Saving Private Ryan” (1998) and his career began to take off.” Diesel was paid $1 million to star in the 2000 breakthrough car-racing movie “The Fast and the Furious,” which brought in $140 million at the box office. Vin Diesel, however, is denying he ever proposed becoming a human tie-in for Diesel clothing during his dark pre-fame days. “It never happened,” said the actor’s publicist Carri McClure. “Diesel had given Vin Diesel some free clothes a few years ago, possibly at the Sundance Film Festival, but that’s the only thing that ever happened.”

RUNNER UP: The Connecticut weekend home of Jaqui Lividini, senior vice president of merchandising at Saks Fifth Avenue, didn’t make the cover of September House Beautiful after all. According to a spokesman, it lost “by a hair” in an online poll. So which house won? The Miami getaway of Calvin Klein chairman Barry and Sheryl Schwartz. But not to worry: Lividini’s Connecticut weekend house is shown in a six-page story inside the issue.

“The fact that the picture was even considered for the cover was amazing,” Lividini said. “We were so proud. It [the renovation] was a labor of love. It was like having a child.”

NYLON NAMES: Nylon is filling in its ranks. Jeffrey Rotter, a former contributing writer for Blender and Spin, has joined as executive editor, a new post. Scott Williams has been named art director, replacing Lina Kutsovskaya, who left. Most recently, Williams was art director of Gear. And, Sophie-Schulte Hillen joins the magazine as beauty and style editor, a new post. Earlier she was a senior beauty writer at YM.

POLO MOVE: Nicole Felsen has been promoted to director of women’s publicity at Polo Ralph Lauren, a new post. Most recently she was manager of women’s publicity. She reports to Rebekah Hirsch, senior director of fashion communications-women’s wear.

KATE SPADE’S LATEST: Inspired by loving, yet imperfect families, Kate Spade’s fall ad campaign is titled, “Visiting Tennessee.” The fictional main character is Tennessee Lawrence, the 26-year-old daughter of Althea and Barnaby Lawrence who lives and works in New York and epitomizes the spirit of Kate Spade. Her family’s annual autumn trip to Manhattan provides the campaign’s narrative that’s filled with emotions ranging from disagreements to warm reunions. The campaign was shot by fine-art photographer Larry Sultan, and the wardrobe designer was Karen Patch, who creates Spade’s signature style with bold colors and strong accessories. Setting out with Tennessee and her family, they travel from the Carlyle Hotel to an East Village record store to a Chelsea art gallery to Central Park. The ads will break as a 12-page insert in the September issue of W, a 10-page insert in Vogue and a four-page insert in Vanity Fair. Additional pages will run in The New Yorker, Town & Country, Nest, Index and Interview Magazines.

RUNNER UP: The Connecticut weekend home of Jaqui Lividini, senior vice president of merchandising at Saks Fifth Avenue, didn’t make the cover of September House Beautiful after all. According to a spokesman, it lost “by a hair” in an online poll. So which house won? The Miami getaway of Calvin Klein chairman Barry and Sheryl Schwartz. But not to worry: Lividini’s Connecticut weekend house is shown in a six-page story inside the issue.

“The fact that the picture was even considered for the cover was amazing,” Lividini said. “We were so proud. It [the renovation] was a labor of love. It was like having a child.”

NYLON NAMES: Nylon is filling in its ranks. Jeffrey Rotter, a former contributing writer for Blender and Spin, has joined as executive editor, a new post. Scott Williams has been named art director, replacing Lina Kutsovskaya, who left. Most recently, Williams was art director of Gear. And, Sophie-Schulte Hillen joins the magazine as beauty and style editor, a new post. Earlier she was a senior beauty writer at YM.

POLO MOVE: Nicole Felsen has been promoted to director of women’s publicity at Polo Ralph Lauren, a new post. Most recently she was manager of women’s publicity. She reports to Rebekah Hirsch, senior director of fashion communications-women’s wear.

KATE SPADE’S LATEST: Inspired by loving, yet imperfect families, Kate Spade’s fall ad campaign is titled, “Visiting Tennessee.” The fictional main character is Tennessee Lawrence, the 26-year-old daughter of Althea and Barnaby Lawrence who lives and works in New York and epitomizes the spirit of Kate Spade. Her family’s annual autumn trip to Manhattan provides the campaign’s narrative that’s filled with emotions ranging from disagreements to warm reunions. The campaign was shot by fine-art photographer Larry Sultan, and the wardrobe designer was Karen Patch, who creates Spade’s signature style with bold colors and strong accessories. Setting out with Tennessee and her family, they travel from the Carlyle Hotel to an East Village record store to a Chelsea art gallery to Central Park. The ads will break as a 12-page insert in the September issue of W, a 10-page insert in Vogue and a four-page insert in Vanity Fair. Additional pages will run in The New Yorker, Town & Country, Nest, Index and Interview Magazines.

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