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Moms of Distinction Honored

"I can't cook. I can't clean. Being a good mother was kind of a confusing thing," admitted designer Eileen Fisher at Thursday's National Mother's Day Council luncheon at The Pierre.

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Glenn Close, Maralyn Lakin, Linda Armstrong Kelly and Eileen Fisher.

John Aquino

NEW YORK — “I can’t cook. I can’t clean. Being a good mother was kind of a confusing thing,” admitted designer Eileen Fisher at Thursday’s National Mother’s Day Council luncheon at The Pierre.

Nonetheless, Fisher, along with actress Glenn Close; Linda Armstrong Kelly, the author, motivational speaker and mother of cycling champion Lance Armstrong; tennis star Pam Shriver, and Maralyn Lakin, senior vice president of advertising at Boscov’s Department Stores, were recognized for juggling exemplary careers with motherhood, and received Outstanding Mother Awards from the Council.

“I like having this award. It’s something I can point to and tell my kids I am an outstanding mother,” Fisher said. “The hardest thing about being a mother is that you never think you are being a good mother.”

Linda Armstrong said she was a poor 17-year-old when she was pregnant with Lance, and had to work two jobs. “The tough parts [of motherhood] you don’t remember as much as the fun,” she said.

“This feels almost like being at my bat mitzvah,” Lakin said from the podium. “Being a mom is about giving to your children, your family and your co-workers,” Lakin said, who came with 40 members of the Boscov’s team to the event. It drew about 550 guests and benefited Women In Need, which helps homeless and disadvantaged women and their children. Thia Breen, president of Estée Lauder Worldwide and this year’s chair of the National Mother’s Day Council, said: “These women are role models not only to their children, but to mothers everywhere who strive to excel at home and the workplace. In 1903, when the Council was formed, 3 percent of American women were working. Today, 80 percent are working.”

This story first appeared in the May 11, 2007 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

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