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On The Drawing Board: Temperley’s Teepee… An American In Paris

Pocahontas should have been so lucky. British designer Alice Temperley and her cider-making father Julian have teamed with One & Only resorts to add some Native American style to the luxury hotel suite.

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Alice Temperley's teepee for One & Only.

WWD Staff

TEMPERLEY’S TEEPEE: Pocahontas should have been so lucky.

British designer Alice Temperley, who is famous for her bohemian flair, and her cider-making father Julian have teamed with One & Only resorts to add some Native American style to the luxury hotel suite. They have created a high-end teepee — or tipi, as they refer to it at One & Only — for the Le Saint Géran resort in Mauritius.

The bejeweled, hand-stitched teepee is 17 feet tall and 20 feet in diameter. It features a Parisian glass chandelier, wooden floor and swags of gold fabric, and is meant for sleeping, spa treatments and just hanging out. Resort packages involving the teepee would include a “glampfire,” or private dinner, on the beach for two to 16 people; Thai massage; yoga, or a Bastien foot and leg massage. For the more cerebral, the hotel is also offering lectures on the island from a local historian.

Temperley isn’t the first British designer to collaborate with One & Only. Matthew Williamson has designed a kaftan, and Anya Hindmarch has created a bag for the resort group. — Samantha Conti

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS: Hubert Givenchy, his partner Philippe Venet, and U.S. Ambassador to France Craig Roberts Stapleton and his wife were among the guests at the Mona Bismarck Foundation at 34 Rue de New York in Paris for the opening of “An American View: Barbara Ernst Prey.” On view through Jan. 28, the exhibition features sketchbooks from Prey’s travels around the world, magazine illustrations and more than 50 watercolors, including the one she created for the 2003 White House holiday card. Givenchy was drawn to Prey’s paintings of New England houses. — Rosemary Feitelberg

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