Indie Men’s Brand Yoko Devereaux to Close

Men's wear label Yoko Deveraux will close due to a withdrawal in financial and production resources from the company's business partner.

Indie men’s wear label Yoko Devereaux is halting operations after nine years in business.

This story first appeared in the June 30, 2009 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Founder and designer Andy Salzer said he is winding down the company in the next few weeks because business partner Wing Son Garments, a Toronto-based private label manufacturer, is withdrawing funding and production resources.

Yoko Devereaux was founded in 2000 by Salzer and Thomas Meus, who left the firm after several seasons. Salzer went on to grow it from a fledgling T-shirt brand into a full men’s collection that appealed to the downtown crowd and is carried in about 200 doors, including Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Avenue, Revolve Clothing and Rolo.

This past spring, Salzer launched a diffusion label, called Yoko D., exclusively in Urban Outfitters stores. The line, which included a woven shirt, tank top, shorts and a jacket, is carried in a majority of the specialty chain’s 143 doors. As with the main collection, the fall Yoko D. line will not be produced.

Wing Son Garments acquired a 50 percent share in Yoko Devereaux in 2007, and for the past two years handled all financing, production, shipping and bookkeeping for the brand. The economic downturn has affected Wing Son Garments and forced the company to sever their commitment to Yoko Devereaux, Salzer said.

A spokesman for Wing Son Garments confirmed the company is exiting the business but declined further comment.

Yoko Devereaux is based in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where it also operates a freestanding store in the space that Salzer uses as a design studio. The store and the brand’s e-commerce site are currently holding liquidation sales of remaining merchandise, and will then shutter.

While posting limited sales volume, Yoko Devereaux gained a notable following among fashion world insiders, in large part from the creative fashion shows it managed to stage on shoe-string budgets during New York Fashion Week.