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Cocona to be Rebranded as 37.5

The company re-branding its high performance technology to better identify its properties.

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Bye-bye Cocona, hello 37.5.

Cocona, Inc. is re-branding its high performance technology, Cocona, to better identify its properties. The new name is 37.5, which refers to the body’s ability to manage temperature and humidity next to the skin to maintain 37.5 percent humidity and a 37.5 degree Celsius core body temperature. The technology is targeted to the activewear market since its patented active-particle properties capture and release moisture and help the body maintain optimal humidity and temperature.

“If our bodies expend less energy staying comfortable, that means more energy can be directed into the activities we love,” said Jeff Bowman, chief executive officer of Cocona Inc. “Beginning as early as spring 2014, products manufactured with 37.5 technology will come with point-of-sale materials explaining the exceptional performance characteristics of the technology — allowing retailers and consumers to understand why our partners’ products not only feel better, but work better.”

In addition to cooling properties, 37.5 doesn’t retain odors, a problem with many synthetic fabrics used for performance apparel, the company said. 

Bauer Performance Sports Ltd. signed a deal earlier this month to use the fiber in Bauer Hockey’s base layer, training apparel and protective equipment. “This revolutionary fast-drying technology will be a key feature that will help players maximize their performance off the ice during training and on the ice when their game matters most,” said Kathy McGown, general manager for apparel at Bauer Hockey.

Other brands using 37.5 technology include Adidas, The North Face, Pearl Izumi, Asics, Rip Curl, Eddie Bauer, Salomon, Under Armour and Cutter & Buck.

Previously, 37.5 technology was marketed under the Cocona brand name, since it used active carbon particles derived from coconut shells. The technology has since been expanded to use additional natural materials that are infused into synthetic fibers for use in everything from apparel and shoes to bedding.

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