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DKNY Opens Pop-up in NYC

Concept shop is located in the Flatiron District and includes a well-edited mix of off-the-runway looks.

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NEW YORK — Looking to build off the success it has had with a similar project in Los Angeles, DKNY has opened a pop-up concept shop in the Flatiron District here with a well-edited mix of off-the-runway looks.

The 2,000-square-foot space at 168 Fifth Avenue opened its doors Friday, joining a bustling neighborhood that includes Club Monaco, Restoration Hardware, MAC Cosmetics, Eileen Fisher, BCBG and Eataly. DKNY president of retail Carol Sharpe said, “We were looking at all the key neighborhoods. We knew we wanted to test this here. We knew the brand would get more visibility in New York City.”

Unlike the brand’s concept shop in the open-air Century City Mall in Los Angeles, the New York location has more of an urban feel with exposed brick walls, and display tables and shelves made from repurposed scaffolding. Another point of distinction is that “New York” and other words such as “will never leave” are spelled out in lights. Fresh flowers from the city’s flower district soften up the interior.

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DKNY set out to design a neighborhood-y space that would appeal to Flatiron District shoppers — many of whom buzz into stores during their lunch breaks. Judging from staffers’ reactions, window shoppers and first-day buyers, Sharpe expects a silk camp shirt, a simple tote handbag, grommet sneakers and jeans to be popular. The mix includes DKNY Pure, jeans and fashion items. “We can change the assortment really easily depending on what the neighborhood reacts to,” Sharpe said. “It really has a point of view.”

Shoppers will also walk away with bags stamped with a “DKNY Flatiron Pop-up Open” icon that includes a little grid map showing exactly where the store is located.

Patti Cohen, Donna Karan Inter-national’s executive vice president of global marketing, said, “It really feels like part of the neighborhood and almost as though it’s always been there.”

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