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Who’s Who: Barneys’ Decision Makers

The executives who lead the store.

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David New, executive vice president, creative services; 17 years at Barneys New York. New is responsible for the look and ambience of Barneys stores, and has focused on interior design and visual merchandising and bringing the luxury signature to Chicago, Dallas, Boston, Las Vegas, Scottsdale and San Francisco. New believes it’s more important than ever to provide a luxurious, entertaining environment.

Tom Kalenderian
, executive vice president, general merchandise manager of men’s wear and Chelsea Passage; 30 years at Barneys. Kalenderian is considered a walking encyclopedia on men’s wear and all its intricacies. His big challenge has been the decline of tailored business attire, but he’s working closely with manufacturers to introduce lower price points and exclusive collections to jump-start that business.

Marc Perlowitz, executive vice president of human resources/legal counsel; 24 years at Barneys. Perlowitz has been instrumental in getting beneficial deals for the company, including changes to leases and agreements on warehouse sale locations, and cultivating a familial atmosphere, from elevating morale during the Nineties bankruptcy to recently instituting ice cream days for the staff.

Judy Collinson, executive vice president, gmm of women’s; 20 years at Barneys. Collinson is driven to make sure no one mistakes Barneys for a department store, and is passionate about merchandising small artisans and unknown designers, having introduced Henry Cuir leather goods and fine jewelry from the late Kazuko. But her greatest passion may be the Barneys New York collection, which she guides.

Vince Phelan
, executive vice president, chief financial officer; 14 years at Barneys. Recently promoted, Phelan is the front man for dealing with factors, banks and vendors, and communicating with parent company Istithmar. He was key in smoothing over recent issues with factors to help release shipments and reassure vendors amid financial concerns.

Michael Celestino, executive vice president of store operations; 18 years at Barneys. Celestino is on the front lines in the stores, talking to managers and sales associates daily, and he recently stepped up his trips to out-of-town stores to motivate the staff and help compensate for the chief executive officer vacancy. He’s been a proponent of opening Fred’s restaurants and cautiously adding warehouse sales.

Karl Hermanns, executive vice president of marketing, advertising, Web; 13 years at Barneys. Hermanns oversaw the development and growth of barneys.com, launched four years ago; maintains the cutting-edge character of the advertising, and recently has been working to cut out marketing costs, including eliminating less-productive mailers.

 


 

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