Bottega Veneta is on a roll with a record year that broke through the $1 billion barrier, and Tomas Maier’s beautiful fall collection should keep up that momentum.

Maier continued to refine the Bottega Veneta woman, this time via a distinct Forties vibe demonstrated with a light hand and thoughtful sense of precision, right down to the models’ hair, this through a Seventies lens — parted to the side and teased.

The all-black looks that started the show — the chic crepe coat with exposed seams, for instance, which Maier accessorized with a top-handle intrecciato bag — had a ladylike allure, with a hint of Lanvin.

The designer made a strong point with fabric constructions, manipulating flannels and wools into three-dimensional folds that were placed around the waist or applied to architectural shoulders. It made for an intriguing view. Some of the more intricate constructions felt a bit cumbersome — a dress with extended shoulders that read Bilbao’s Guggenheim is not for everyone — but for the most part Maier showed a sense of control.

Throughout, he also kept his crafty proclivities in check. The artsier touches came via colorful abstract embroidery, like the sleeveless white wool flannel dress with a painterly motif in an uneven texture. The embroideries carried into evening, when jazzy touches were added to shimmery dresses, sending a quietly glamorous message.

 

Bottega Veneta is on a roll with a record year that broke through the $1 billion barrier, and Tomas Maier’s beautiful fall collection should keep up that momentum.

Maier continued to refine the Bottega Veneta woman, this time via a distinct Forties vibe demonstrated with a light hand and thoughtful sense of precision, right down to the models’ hair, this through a Seventies lens — parted to the side and teased.

The all-black looks that started the show — the chic crepe coat with exposed seams, for instance, which Maier accessorized with a top-handle intrecciato bag — had a ladylike allure, with a hint of Lanvin.

The designer made a strong point with fabric constructions, manipulating flannels and wools into three-dimensional folds that were placed around the waist or applied to architectural shoulders. It made for an intriguing view. Some of the more intricate constructions felt a bit cumbersome — a dress with extended shoulders that read Bilbao’s Guggenheim is not for everyone — but for the most part Maier showed a sense of control.

Throughout, he also kept his crafty proclivities in check. The artsier touches came via colorful abstract embroidery, like the sleeveless white wool flannel dress with a painterly motif in an uneven texture. The embroideries carried into evening, when jazzy touches were added to shimmery dresses, sending a quietly glamorous message.

 

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