2015 Fall Ready-to-Wear

Marchesa

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Marchesa RTW Fall 2015

Marchesa RTW Fall 2015

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  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015
  • Marchesa RTW Fall 2015

Marchesa RTW Fall 2015

The mood was sinfully seductive, enhanced by dark lipstick, Fitzgerald hair and dresses in bordello-red, black and aubergine.

The most progressive idea in Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig’s fall collection, a hedonistic fantasy they called “Opium Dreams,” were rich, tabard-style tops draped over the body, leaving it bare on the sides except for a few spare straps. They were lavished with decadent silk fringe and embroideries and worn over black trousers — a look that’s not entirely new, but still, the most novel thing in eveningwear.
“We’re really feeling it,” said Chapman of the fancy pants look. “Some of the tops are floor length. We definitely feel it’s black-tie worthy.”

The mood was sinfully seductive, enhanced by dark lipstick, Fitzgerald hair and dresses in bordello-red, black and aubergine, with gorgeous macramé details and tulle bases that gave the appearance of being nude. These women were not afraid to indulge. It was a strong statement from Chapman and Craig, who worked throwback Twenties and Thirties silhouettes and minimized the princess dresses that are obligations for special-occasion designers. That said, there were classic columns and a few poufy, frilled frocks to satisfy the demands of traditional clients who want a fairytale — a dark one this season.

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