2015 Fall Ready-to-Wear

Olympia Le Tan

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Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015

TIME AFTER TIMEOlympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015

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  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
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  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
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  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
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  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
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  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015
  • Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015

Olympia Le Tan RTW Fall 2015

“A bunch of trippy ballerinas,” is how Olympia Le-Tan summarized her energetic fall show, titled “The Red Shoes” after the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale.

“A bunch of trippy ballerinas,” is how Olympia Le-Tan summarized her energetic fall show, titled “The Red Shoes” after the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale.
The French designer also mixed some Ballet Russes elements, Seventies London nostalgia and her idol Kate Bush into a collection rich in details and visual oomph. There were graphic motifs taken from the original costumes designed for Diaghilev’s “Daphnis and Chloé” production as well as trompe l’oeil curtains adorning shirtdresses and some of the velvet looks, including A-line-shaped skirts.

 
One cheeky top pretended to unveil a model’s boob, but it was in fact an embroidery effect. Le-Tan’s signature pin-up girl was still sexy, but with a more sophisticated touch. Chiffon and satin were used extensively to create secretary blouses with puffy sleeves and necktie collars, while intarsia knit tops were a foil to all the tutu numbers. Too bad there was not more of the cocooning shearling-tweed outerwear Le-Tan worked out with French mill Malhia Kent.

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