2015 Fall Ready-to-Wear

Sharon Wauchob

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Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015

Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015

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  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015
  • Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015

Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2015

For fall, Wauchob furthered her fascination offering up intriguing clin d’oeil surfaces.

No one works lace like Sharon Wauchob. Often dismissed as a frumpy grandma fabric, in the hands of this Irish designer the delicate and overtly romantic material turns ageless and timeless.

 

For fall, Wauchob furthered her fascination offering up intriguing clin d’oeil surfaces that left one wondering about the fabric’s exact composition given the Lurex-like sparkle exquisitely woven into its delightful floral patterns. The effect was unassumingly sexy and hugely desirable when cut into blush pink and silver-gray — for the lack of a better term — secretary dresses.

 

Elsewhere, Wauchob’s lacework involved fine embroideries mimicking the patterns of exotic skins, which also appeared as prints on ponyskin car coats. Wisely used, fur also made a powerful statement via oversize Mongolian stoles, which — from a distance — resembled short-sleeved coats. All of this was done without a scent of pretention. But there was a nod to this season’s major trend: cropped bell bottoms, which the designer used throughout the lineup in homage to the late Sixties and early Seventies.

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