2015 Men's Fall Collections

Dunhill

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Dunhill Men’s RTW Fall 2015

Dunhill Men's RTW Fall 2015

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  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015
  • Dunhill Mens RTW Fall 2015

Dunhill Men’s RTW Fall 2015

This was John Ray’s first full runway show for Dunhill, and the creative director got off to a smashing start.

John Ray’s debut runway collection for the brand was a refined, glamorous effort inspired by late Fifties and early Sixties British bohemians, Soho denizens and men such as Francis Bacon, Richard Burton and John Osborne. “It’s the spirit and energy of London,” said Ray who cast stylish young bucks — including artist Guy Gormley, musician Gwilym Gold and the pro-hunting activist Otis Ferry — to walk alongside the models.

The collection spanned pieces as diverse as plaid shirts, silk pajamas and even a mink coat modeled on one worn by Burton. There was outerwear galore, including a big alpaca coat layered over silk striped pajamas; plaid or hound’s tooth wool coats worn as casually as dressing gowns; and a parka with a shearling lining and fluffy fur collar.

Suit trousers had high waists and were often worn with suspenders — much like the way Ray himself dresses. Tweed jackets had a preppy feel, while corduroy ones were looser with rounded shoulders, resembling artists’ smocks. The color palette, according to Ray, was inspired by leftover paints found in Bacon’s studio. Thanks to men like Ray, the British creative spirit is alive and well.

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