Joseph Abboud paid homage to his vision of America with a tailored, clothing-driven show bursting with a multitude of textured fabrics, prints and playful layering techniques.

 

All manufactured in the company’s New Bedford, Mass., factory, the line was an “ode to American craftsmanship and tailoring,” the designer said backstage before the show that opened New York Fashion Show: Men’s.

 

He used his traditional gray and brown palette in a wide range of traditional men’s wear patterns, ranging from pinstripes and tweeds to embellished paisleys.

 

His love for layering scarves added another element of depth. Although at times overwhelming, a shawl-like gray American flag brought home the message of his U.S. roots.

 

Abboud said he was most proud of the “whole rugged dandyism” and the “texture and pattern together — that’s our signature.”

 

The show marked Abboud’s return to the runway after more than a decade, but the designer felt no pressure. “It’s nostalgic, but it’s a continuation of my work,” he said, “and I love my work.”

 

And while that work may not set any new fashion trends, it felt true to his heritage.

By  on February 2, 2016
Joseph Abboud Men's RTW Fall 2016

Joseph Abboud paid homage to his vision of America with a tailored, clothing-driven show bursting with a multitude of textured fabrics, prints and playful layering techniques. All manufactured in the company's New Bedford, Mass., factory, the line was an "ode to American craftsmanship and tailoring," the designer said backstage before the show that opened New York Fashion Show: Men's. He used his traditional gray and brown palette in a wide range of traditional men's wear patterns, ranging from pinstripes and tweeds to embellished paisleys. His love for layering scarves added another element of depth. Although at times overwhelming, a shawl-like gray American flag brought home the message of his U.S. roots. Abboud said he was most proud of the "whole rugged dandyism" and the "texture and pattern together — that's our signature." The show marked Abboud's return to the runway after more than a decade, but the designer felt no pressure. "It's nostalgic, but it's a continuation of my work," he said, "and I love my work." And while that work may not set any new fashion trends, it felt true to his heritage.

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