Looking to the slick glamour of Seventies racing in Monte Carlo as his starting line, Tim Coppens took the utility of drivers’ one-piece protective suits and transformed it with inventive fabrics like treated furniture leather, cork and nylon-metal mesh.

Minimalist silhouettes punctuated by bold geometric seaming gave the pieces a cool, modernist quality. Black, white and gray were the predominant color schemes, with the racing theme referenced in colored panels of mustard and gold to connote finish-line flags.

In a first for Coppens, the same motifs, materials and techniques were distilled into a group of women’s looks, like skirt-and-top combos that were reworked versions of the men’s designs. The literal adaptation could have benefited from a touch more femininity, as the theme was better suited to the sleekly conceived men’s wear.

Looking to the slick glamour of Seventies racing in Monte Carlo as his starting line, Tim Coppens took the utility of drivers’ one-piece protective suits and transformed it with inventive fabrics like treated furniture leather, cork and nylon-metal mesh.


Minimalist silhouettes punctuated by bold geometric seaming gave the pieces a cool, modernist quality. Black, white and gray were the predominant color schemes, with the racing theme referenced in colored panels of mustard and gold to connote finish-line flags.

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