For their first pre-collection, Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters distilled a typically obscure point of reference — “the rise of neo-paganism in England in the Seventies,” said Peters — into strong separates. While the silhouettes and color scheme (green, orange and burgundy) channeled the Seventies, the pagan-spiritual thing remained largely in the designers’ heads, aside from a few nuanced Victorian details on a slip and fringe on dresses and skirts.

Gabier and Peters focused on defining strong, everyday items such as a burgundy A-line leather skirt and crisp shirts with retro plaid panels.

For their first pre-collection, Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters distilled a typically obscure point of reference — “the rise of neo-paganism in England in the Seventies,” said Peters — into strong separates. While the silhouettes and color scheme (green, orange and burgundy) channeled the Seventies, the pagan-spiritual thing remained largely in the designers’ heads, aside from a few nuanced Victorian details on a slip and fringe on dresses and skirts.

Gabier and Peters focused on defining strong, everyday items such as a burgundy A-line leather skirt and crisp shirts with retro plaid panels.

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