Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren carried over last season’s conscious couture thread — they had repurposed scraps from past collections into new designs — in this tribute to the beauty of imperfection.

This time, it was hooked on a collection of dresses in a range of quirky constructions made from collages of fragments of vintage cocktail and evening gowns from across the decades — stretching back to the Forties — that the designers had deconstructed and reconstructed “in a surreal way.”

All variety of fabrics, patterns and finishes, from Liberty prints to lamé, came patched together in tonal assemblages. But these dresses were proud of their scars, with each fragment edged with gold Lurex treated like an embroidery, using a variety of techniques including braiding, crocheting and knitting. It was inspired by the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery called kintsugi where, when something breaks and is mended, the cracks are accentuated, the designers said.

Colored tulle was also a linking feature, in the form of asymmetric sashes, skirts and shoulder accents, or giant collars recalling a Pierrot ruff.

The collection climaxed in a run of tulle ballgowns in sherbet shades, where the fragments scattered on skirts looked a little heavy. But with couture’s essence all about one-offs, this was a charming twist on the tradition.

By  on January 25, 2017
Viktor & Rolf Couture Spring 2017

Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren carried over last season's conscious couture thread — they had repurposed scraps from past collections into new designs — in this tribute to the beauty of imperfection.This time, it was hooked on a collection of dresses in a range of quirky constructions made from collages of fragments of vintage cocktail and evening gowns from across the decades — stretching back to the Forties — that the designers had deconstructed and reconstructed "in a surreal way."All variety of fabrics, patterns and finishes, from Liberty prints to lamé, came patched together in tonal assemblages. But these dresses were proud of their scars, with each fragment edged with gold Lurex treated like an embroidery, using a variety of techniques including braiding, crocheting and knitting. It was inspired by the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery called kintsugi where, when something breaks and is mended, the cracks are accentuated, the designers said.Colored tulle was also a linking feature, in the form of asymmetric sashes, skirts and shoulder accents, or giant collars recalling a Pierrot ruff.The collection climaxed in a run of tulle ballgowns in sherbet shades, where the fragments scattered on skirts looked a little heavy. But with couture's essence all about one-offs, this was a charming twist on the tradition.

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