Richard Nicoll played with the idea of “graphic athleticism,” mixing up color, print and texture for his daywear-oriented collection. A white, floor-length pique gown took its cue from the classic tennis dress, a breezy tailored suit was made from men’s striped shirting fabric and graphic prints with a Pucci vibe were used for silk separates. Nicoll also turned to Stephen Walters and Sons — the British silk weaving firm founded in 1720 — for vintage tie fabrics, which he worked into silk shifts, giving them added texture and embellishment.

Richard Nicoll played with the idea of “graphic athleticism,” mixing up color, print and texture for his daywear-oriented collection. A white, floor-length pique gown took its cue from the classic tennis dress, a breezy tailored suit was made from men’s striped shirting fabric and graphic prints with a Pucci vibe were used for silk separates. Nicoll also turned to Stephen Walters and Sons — the British silk weaving firm founded in 1720 — for vintage tie fabrics, which he worked into silk shifts, giving them added texture and embellishment.

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