In the span of two seasons, Fernando Garcia and Laura Kim have made Monse one of the most talked-about startups in New York. Key to that buzz has been their youthful, modern way of feminizing classic men’s wear items, starting with the button-down shirt for their first collection, the suit for their second, and now for their first resort lineup, the trench. They worked it as a dress, and as a short navy jacket cinched with a wide belt and a green asymmetrical skirt that fell in structured folds for relaxed volume. The looks, including a red handkerchief shirt and great exaggerated wide-leg khaki cargo pants, were cut to capture a sense of the undone — nothing too perfect — which gave the lineup a fresh sensuality. There were also printed scarf dresses, tuxedo-inspired eveningwear and some nice lace-up knits that balanced the statement pieces with something for everyday.

 

The trench might have been the conceptual focus, but the big picture was business. “We wanted [the clothes] to be something you can wear all year round,” said Kim. “We’re more price-conscious than the runway collections, and we’re building our basics program.”

By  on June 9, 2016
Monse Resort 2017

In the span of two seasons, Fernando Garcia and Laura Kim have made Monse one of the most talked-about startups in New York. Key to that buzz has been their youthful, modern way of feminizing classic men’s wear items, starting with the button-down shirt for their first collection, the suit for their second, and now for their first resort lineup, the trench. They worked it as a dress, and as a short navy jacket cinched with a wide belt and a green asymmetrical skirt that fell in structured folds for relaxed volume. The looks, including a red handkerchief shirt and great exaggerated wide-leg khaki cargo pants, were cut to capture a sense of the undone — nothing too perfect — which gave the lineup a fresh sensuality. There were also printed scarf dresses, tuxedo-inspired eveningwear and some nice lace-up knits that balanced the statement pieces with something for everyday. The trench might have been the conceptual focus, but the big picture was business. “We wanted [the clothes] to be something you can wear all year round,” said Kim. “We’re more price-conscious than the runway collections, and we’re building our basics program.”

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