There was a distinct connection between Vera Wang’s spring bridal lineup and her recent fall ready-to-wear collection, both featuring light, breathy empire dresses, capes and interesting sleeve details.

“I’ve wanted that,” said Wang of the fusion between rtw and bridal during a preview. “I’ve wanted that forever, but we have 24 stores globally now with very different clients. Because of that, we really have to satisfy a lot of needs and they aren’t purely inspirational or artistic. Each culture seems to have a different kind of bride.”

If she’s felt hemmed in by tradition in the past, Wang felt the customer is ready for a little push and she’s in a position to challenge them with edgier wedding attire now that she’s approach her 30th year in business. The collection had traditional wedding trappings — ivory tulle, passementerie, Chantilly lace, a ballgown or two — but Wang worked them in a modernist way, avoiding ornamentation on spare, architectural silhouettes that were countered by loose, Gothic bohemian peasant dresses.

By Wang’s estimation, she’s done more than 12,000 weddings per year for 30 years. “That’s a lot of brides,” she said. “I don’t think there’s anything we haven’t explored.” She thinks the brides of today are more open to creative bridal options. “I know what girls need and who they become when they become brides,” said Wang. “It’s a wonderful time to be able to push them to look at things in a different way and know they’ll be more receptive.”

By  on April 21, 2017
Vera Wang Bridal Spring 2018

There was a distinct connection between Vera Wang’s spring bridal lineup and her recent fall ready-to-wear collection, both featuring light, breathy empire dresses, capes and interesting sleeve details.“I’ve wanted that,” said Wang of the fusion between rtw and bridal during a preview. “I’ve wanted that forever, but we have 24 stores globally now with very different clients. Because of that, we really have to satisfy a lot of needs and they aren’t purely inspirational or artistic. Each culture seems to have a different kind of bride.”If she’s felt hemmed in by tradition in the past, Wang felt the customer is ready for a little push and she’s in a position to challenge them with edgier wedding attire now that she’s approach her 30th year in business. The collection had traditional wedding trappings — ivory tulle, passementerie, Chantilly lace, a ballgown or two — but Wang worked them in a modernist way, avoiding ornamentation on spare, architectural silhouettes that were countered by loose, Gothic bohemian peasant dresses.By Wang’s estimation, she’s done more than 12,000 weddings per year for 30 years. “That’s a lot of brides,” she said. “I don’t think there’s anything we haven’t explored.” She thinks the brides of today are more open to creative bridal options. “I know what girls need and who they become when they become brides,” said Wang. “It’s a wonderful time to be able to push them to look at things in a different way and know they’ll be more receptive.”

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