Now that creative director Bill Gaytten no longer serves double duty on Dior and John Galliano, he can focus on putting his own signature on the latter brand — and it showed for spring.

Gaytten moved away from the founder’s theatrics in favor of a cleaner, more architectural sensibility that played to fashion’s current fascination with volume. He worked it via Japanese touches or, as he put it, “Geisha notes,” i.e., origamilike bra tops with flowing pants and gowns with front pleating and folds, fitted from behind with an exposed back. The overall effect was highly sculpted but still light — a notion Gaytten extended to the pretty coats that looked as sweet and airy as whipped cream. Oversize kimonos added a bit of Poiret, though rendered with a modern hand — there was no room for vintage in this collection.

The pale, at times underwhelming, colors were balanced with interesting urban prints, like one of a flying man and another of hundreds of cars in standstill traffic. While the clothes lacked the over-the-top romance of Gaytten’s predecessor, this designer still managed to breathe some fresh — and welcome — air into the brand.

Sign In to Your Account
load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus