Retire your heels, ladies, and start pedaling, swimming, dancing, running or striking a downward dog pose. Perspiration is a positive thing, and Stella McCartney wants women to look good doing it. The designer’s presentation featured athletes working out in her latest collection for Adidas — a visual vitamin boost of bright orange, yellow, pale acid green, deep blue and dusty pink shades. “I don’t see a big void between fashion and sportswear, and I don’t want women to have to sacrifice their style for sport,” said McCartney during a walk-through.

Synchronized swimmers dressed in sleek, black one-piece suits with geometric cutouts around the midriff did their routines in water tanks; women wearing all-in-one breathable mesh bodysuits practiced aerial yoga on long black slings while runners showed off some unconventional, ultrafeminine looks, including one daisy-printed A-line top with a drawstring neckline. “That top protects from the wind,” said McCartney. Other running gear featured blue and white marbled prints. Jackets for all sports were made of a lightweight double mesh with chunky two-way zips, while others had neoprene panels. Many of the products were made with waste-free techniques and printed with dry-dye injection methods that do not require water, McCartney said.

Retire your heels, ladies, and start pedaling, swimming, dancing, running or striking a downward dog pose. Perspiration is a positive thing, and Stella McCartney wants women to look good doing it. The designer’s presentation featured athletes working out in her latest collection for Adidas — a visual vitamin boost of bright orange, yellow, pale acid green, deep blue and dusty pink shades. “I don’t see a big void between fashion and sportswear, and I don’t want women to have to sacrifice their style for sport,” said McCartney during a walk-through.

Synchronized swimmers dressed in sleek, black one-piece suits with geometric cutouts around the midriff did their routines in water tanks; women wearing all-in-one breathable mesh bodysuits practiced aerial yoga on long black slings while runners showed off some unconventional, ultrafeminine looks, including one daisy-printed A-line top with a drawstring neckline. “That top protects from the wind,” said McCartney. Other running gear featured blue and white marbled prints. Jackets for all sports were made of a lightweight double mesh with chunky two-way zips, while others had neoprene panels. Many of the products were made with waste-free techniques and printed with dry-dye injection methods that do not require water, McCartney said.

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