A futuristic, Jetsons-like world was what Keiichiro Yuri created on his spring runway, dressing his models in weird and quirky shapes, metallic materials and brightly colored, abstract prints. Originally a bag designer, he attempted to incorporate some of those principles into his ready-to-wear, often making “wearable bags.”

Aside from its Space Age oddity, the collection didn’t seem to have much of an overriding theme, instead looking more like individual looks with little relation to each other. There were sculptural, clear plastic bodices worn over a metallic gold tube top and miniskirt, or a patent and leopard print tube dress, while a couple of all-white looks seemed to be emanating wedding dresses.

One of Yuri’s more interesting pieces was an orange A-line dress made from kimono fabric and mimicking the traditional garment, although this fell short and would have fared better with more experimentation. Other looks that were more relevant to the market were sporty yet cool takes on ath-leisure. A pair of silver track pants, striped chiffon warm-up coats and red leather-look leggings would all seem at home on the streets of Tokyo, and a cropped tank top with a built-in backpack was a clever use of the designer’s skills.

By  on October 23, 2016
Keiichirosense RTW Spring 2017

A futuristic, Jetsons-like world was what Keiichiro Yuri created on his spring runway, dressing his models in weird and quirky shapes, metallic materials and brightly colored, abstract prints. Originally a bag designer, he attempted to incorporate some of those principles into his ready-to-wear, often making “wearable bags.”Aside from its Space Age oddity, the collection didn’t seem to have much of an overriding theme, instead looking more like individual looks with little relation to each other. There were sculptural, clear plastic bodices worn over a metallic gold tube top and miniskirt, or a patent and leopard print tube dress, while a couple of all-white looks seemed to be emanating wedding dresses.One of Yuri’s more interesting pieces was an orange A-line dress made from kimono fabric and mimicking the traditional garment, although this fell short and would have fared better with more experimentation. Other looks that were more relevant to the market were sporty yet cool takes on ath-leisure. A pair of silver track pants, striped chiffon warm-up coats and red leather-look leggings would all seem at home on the streets of Tokyo, and a cropped tank top with a built-in backpack was a clever use of the designer’s skills.

To access this article, click here to subscribe or to log in.

To Read the Full Article
SUBSCRIBE NOW

Tap into our Global Network

Of Industry Leaders and Designers

load comments