A former pattern-maker for Yohji Yamamoto, Teppei Fujita sent a slew of chic vagabonds down his spring runway, creating a delicate balance between polished and grungy. While his collection is categorized as men’s wear, he used several female models as well, following a trend that has been common during Tokyo Fashion Week and emphasizing the unisex quality of his clothes.

Fujita’s proportions were large and loose, with wide-leg paper-bag pants cinched at the waist, extra long sleeves concealing the models’ hands and sweaters hitting below the knee. Pockets were outsized, too, patched onto pants with contrast stitching and raw edges for a carefully haphazard look.

The designer also played with deconstructing the suit, with some jackets pieced together patchwork-style, and others taken apart at the seams to create capes. Contrasting these pieces were loungewear-inspired items, such as robes and velour dresses, pants and tops.

Refreshingly, Fujita designs in a way that is distinctly Japanese, without being derivative of his mentor or other fashion giants. This season, his palette reflected this as well, with neutral white, navy, taupe and black offset by rich red and a tiny splash of blue, colors seen often in traditional Japanese artworks.

By  on October 25, 2016
Sulvam RTW Spring 2017

A former pattern-maker for Yohji Yamamoto, Teppei Fujita sent a slew of chic vagabonds down his spring runway, creating a delicate balance between polished and grungy. While his collection is categorized as men's wear, he used several female models as well, following a trend that has been common during Tokyo Fashion Week and emphasizing the unisex quality of his clothes.Fujita’s proportions were large and loose, with wide-leg paper-bag pants cinched at the waist, extra long sleeves concealing the models’ hands and sweaters hitting below the knee. Pockets were outsized, too, patched onto pants with contrast stitching and raw edges for a carefully haphazard look.The designer also played with deconstructing the suit, with some jackets pieced together patchwork-style, and others taken apart at the seams to create capes. Contrasting these pieces were loungewear-inspired items, such as robes and velour dresses, pants and tops.Refreshingly, Fujita designs in a way that is distinctly Japanese, without being derivative of his mentor or other fashion giants. This season, his palette reflected this as well, with neutral white, navy, taupe and black offset by rich red and a tiny splash of blue, colors seen often in traditional Japanese artworks.

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