Best known for his loud use of color and overtly feminine aesthetic, Ryan Lo did well in turning it down a notch for spring. The designer immersed himself in all things British, with a special mention of the royal family – perhaps a nod to his newly acquired British citizenship and his desire to signal a more grown-up attitude. “I have moved on,” he kept stressing backstage after the show.

Funeral black and wedding white, with occasional glimpses of powder pink, dominated a lineup that was strong on texture. Lo developed a series of playful fabrics, including bouncy strips of tulle woven onto a cotton base, which looked fresh on both a dressy, long gown as well as a hooded anorak featuring a large pussy bow that Lo said he borrowed from Lady Di.

Little black and little white dresses done up with puffy sleeves in shimmering jacquards telegraphed baby-doll cute, but as Lo matched them with feisty Doc Martens and quirky top hats designed by his buddy Stephen Jones, the visual instantly switched to rebel-chic.

Meanwhile, with thick strings of pearls meandering up their waists and across their bodies in lieu of the more conventional regalia, Lo’s princesses heralded a boastful change of guard in the royal palace. Would the Queen approve? There is a good chance. Her beloved Launer handbags were part of the show, though when Lo was done with them, they just looked street.

By  on September 15, 2017

Best known for his loud use of color and overtly feminine aesthetic, Ryan Lo did well in turning it down a notch for spring. The designer immersed himself in all things British, with a special mention of the royal family – perhaps a nod to his newly acquired British citizenship and his desire to signal a more grown-up attitude. “I have moved on,” he kept stressing backstage after the show.Funeral black and wedding white, with occasional glimpses of powder pink, dominated a lineup that was strong on texture. Lo developed a series of playful fabrics, including bouncy strips of tulle woven onto a cotton base, which looked fresh on both a dressy, long gown as well as a hooded anorak featuring a large pussy bow that Lo said he borrowed from Lady Di.Little black and little white dresses done up with puffy sleeves in shimmering jacquards telegraphed baby-doll cute, but as Lo matched them with feisty Doc Martens and quirky top hats designed by his buddy Stephen Jones, the visual instantly switched to rebel-chic.Meanwhile, with thick strings of pearls meandering up their waists and across their bodies in lieu of the more conventional regalia, Lo's princesses heralded a boastful change of guard in the royal palace. Would the Queen approve? There is a good chance. Her beloved Launer handbags were part of the show, though when Lo was done with them, they just looked street.

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