Sav Lavin designer Savira Lavinia, 25, was among several Indonesian designers making their runway debuts in Los Angeles over the weekend, and her beautifully crafted and well thought-out collection was a welcome sight.

Lavinia, who started her business two years ago in Jakarta, Indonesia, is a meticulous planner, and she said her journals full of dreams written in blue ink inspired the motifs on her mostly white collection.

She was also inspired by the theory of connectionism, which seemed to be a way of saying that all of life’s experiences can manifest themselves in clothes.

“This collection is special for me because I did a lot of research on trends in my country and around the world, but I also researched another human being,” she said, referring to her roommate, a street artist who created the blue motifs and also hand-painted several of her accessories.

Her silhouettes borrowed heavily from traditional Japanese dress such as the kimono and yukata, because the shapes fit many body types, which she says is “more fair.” To account for dressing in the warm climate of Southeast Asia, she used a combination of breathable cotton and eco-friendly Tencel.

By  on October 10, 2017
Sav Lavin RTW Sprng 2018

Sav Lavin designer Savira Lavinia, 25, was among several Indonesian designers making their runway debuts in Los Angeles over the weekend, and her beautifully crafted and well thought-out collection was a welcome sight.Lavinia, who started her business two years ago in Jakarta, Indonesia, is a meticulous planner, and she said her journals full of dreams written in blue ink inspired the motifs on her mostly white collection.She was also inspired by the theory of connectionism, which seemed to be a way of saying that all of life's experiences can manifest themselves in clothes."This collection is special for me because I did a lot of research on trends in my country and around the world, but I also researched another human being," she said, referring to her roommate, a street artist who created the blue motifs and also hand-painted several of her accessories.Her silhouettes borrowed heavily from traditional Japanese dress such as the kimono and yukata, because the shapes fit many body types, which she says is "more fair." To account for dressing in the warm climate of Southeast Asia, she used a combination of breathable cotton and eco-friendly Tencel.

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