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Marcolin USA Eyewear Corp.
Fabrizio Gamberini, ceo

WHAT’S IN

• Flash lenses continue to be a trend and apparent in the Tom Ford, Roberto Cavalli and Dsquared2 collections.
• Women’s shields, such as medium-size shields with a soft cat-eye shape, like Tom Ford, Roberto Cavalli and Balenciaga.
• Most of our collections feature polarized models; it’s a clear signal that consumers are more conscious, paying more attention to the technical quality of the lenses and protecting their eyes. Examples include Tom Ford, Ermenegildo Zegna and Montblanc.

WHAT’S OUT

• Heavy logo applications.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Textures. Balenciaga has a Gaulchat effect stingray and leather for sun and optical.
• Natural materials, such as horn and wood, as seen in the Ermenegildo Zegna couture collection.
• Brightly colored prints and Seventies-inspired silhouettes, as seen in the new Emilio Pucci eyewear collection.

Westward Leaning
Robert Denning, cofounder and creative director

WHAT’S IN

• Transparent, polished acetates in sophisticated hues that make the frames appear like water or ice that’s been dyed with food coloring. I call them “crystal” or “glacial” acetates — our glacial blue, for example, is new in our Pioneer 11 model. Basically, acetates that look like liquid cough syrup; crystal blue is basically the color of NyQuil.
• Richer, non-primary colors of crystals; champagne instead of taxi-cab yellow, for example.

WHAT’S OUT

• High-contrast colorblocking of mirrored lenses, especially in black frames. The days of placing the most garish neon lens you could find in a black or white frame are over. Unexpected tints are finally taking mirrored lenses beyond the ski slopes of the Eighties….Our reliance on mirrored today is to add depth and refinement, not shock value or boldness.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Frame shapes will continue to get even crazier, and more innovative, unique and beautiful. Sunglasses are just emerging from the Wayfarer-based, “Ray-Ban revivalism” that’s dominated the sun category. The frames we’ll launch over the next six months are differentiated by a more avant-garde approach to shape and a more conservative approach to color.

Foster Grant
Matthew Coon, creative director

WHAT’S IN

• The newest look is the Kitten frame, a younger, rounder take on the classic cat-eye, ideal for collections targeting juniors and women. Butterflies are growing in importance as the easy-to-wear cousin of the cat. Both the Kitten and the Butterfly are softened with curvier edges that make them more flattering.
• Classic frames continue their march with prominence, [such as] resin styles highlighted by keyhole nose bridges and retro details.

WHAT’S OUT

• Really round, oversize shapes.
• The rose gold of 2014 is out; this year it will be brushed with antique and matte finishing to give it a new twist.
• Singular color finishes are replaced with multilayered and mixed-surface textures featuring color and pattern.

WHAT’S NEXT

• The most important finish is the tortoise. These shell finishes range from Eighties references to new multicolored layered resins. Many of the finishes are characterized by a milky fusion to add further richness. This year, there is much more emphasis on the material as a whole rather than additional colored layers, which have been prominent for the past few years.
• Prints are elevated with emphasis put on deep, dark botanicals and tropical prints. In addition, tiny, monochromatic linear and geometric prints add more of a textural feel to different crystal finishes.

Safilo Group
Vladimiro Baldin, global product creation director, and Alessandro Marcer, creative director, premium licensed brands

WHAT’S IN

• Baldin: The most interesting eyewear features innovations like interchangeable elements for maximum versatility, innovative technologies mixing fabric elements and [new-tech] materials that can be twisted or bent without breaking.
• Marcer: New eyewear shapes show an architectural construction, metal wires and supershiny surfaces, visible in the outstanding frame-in-frame structures or in the newest hexagonal shapes, which will be the trend for next season, together with the round and square shapes, which are still an important trend.

WHAT’S OUT

• Marcer: Shields, strong colors, enveloping shapes.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Baldin: Combinations of acetate and metal for unexpected volumes, natural materials such as horn, mixed with colors, and application of embellishment that changes the silhouette of the frontal for a night and day situation.

Smoke x Mirrors
David Shabtai, cofounder

WHAT’S IN

• The Sixties are definitely back; classic is classic. Cool, clean silhouettes are going to continue to be a staple in eyewear, frames like the Shout and Uncle Albert are good examples of updated modern classics.
• Punk is something we’ve been drawing on from the onset and you don’t really see it so much in eyewear. [Our] really bold, unisex silhouettes like Atomic and Viva, as well as more understated pieces like Drivers Seat, play in that edgy realm.

WHAT’S OUT

• Anything that’s flash, “high end” in eyewear has almost been synonymous with something a bit gaudy, big logos — nobody really wants to be a billboard — and glossy impractical detailing, metal nose pads or glued-on brow bars, things that really take away from the quality and comfort of a product you should want to wear on your face.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Hand-crafted design and construction.
• Combination acetates as well as really unique mixes of materials, especially lightweight metals, is where my head is right now.


Luxottica
Holly Rush, president
, Wholesale North America

WHAT’S NEXT

• Mirrored lenses in jewel tones, specifically from Ray-Ban and Michael Kors. Coach and Tory Burch are introducing polarized, gradient lenses in new colors such as purple, violet and blue — a real departure from traditional browns and grays. Lens technology is really exciting this season and making the designer frame investment worth even more.
• We’re looking at a season of exaggerated, vintage-inspired shapes, such as round. Round is versatile and the shape can go from small to large and, really, just a few millimeters can make a big difference in how it looks and appeals to the consumer. While traditional round eyewear is most often associated with men, such as John Lennon or Johnny Depp, we’re seeing the shape evolve nicely in the women’s category from brands such as Michael Kors, Persol, Giorgio Armani and Coach.

WHAT’S OUT

• One frame to meet all needs.
• Sporty shields.
• Light lenses.

WHAT’S NEXT

• We see wearables as a growing phenomenon redefining how people use and interact with information and the world around them. Research shows that comfort is actually the number-one factor when considering a wearable device, since the owner will most likely wear the device almost all the time. Form will be equally as important as function in making wearables a success. We want to help pioneer this change and deliver smart, fashion-forward products that are meaningful to consumers. Our partnerships with Google and Intel will help us get there.

Italia Independent
Giovanni Accongiagioco, cofounder

WHAT’S IN

• New materials and treatments. Today, all the major players are trying to innovate using new technologies. These are the elements that identify trends, and Italia Independent makes of these ingredients its own DNA. We were recognized last year by the MIT Technology Review Italy for the two innovations we brought to the market: the “velvet-effect” and the I-Thermic.
• The velvet effect comes from the automotive industry and it is called UV Lux.
• I-Thermic also comes from the automotive industry. Eyewear characterized by this kind of treatment changes color upon reaching a temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

WHAT’S OUT

• Vintage. In the last 10 years, it has been the dominant characteristic of the eyewear market. Classic shapes like metal aviators — who doesn’t have one of them? The eyewear industry has been anchored to the past for a long time.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Italia Independent launched EYEYE, a family of products based on HD Digital Printing, which allows us to print any pattern on the frames. The infinite possibilities offered by this technology give us the opportunity to interpret the trends of the moment.

Electric
Eric Crane, ceo

WHAT’S IN

• Vintage inspiration fused with technical functionality and high quality is the current formula for Electric.
• Premium Mazzucchelli acetates, acetate-and-metal combos, and chrome-clad wire frames can be found at the top of our range. Lightweight, classic sport-inspired injected pieces are right behind.

WHAT’S OUT

• Cheap rack glasses that are fun but functionless, burning out your retinas with lenses that don’t provide enough protection.

WHAT’S NEXT

• A line inspired by Electric muse Maddison Rothery, which uses premium finishes and marbled white acetates. For fall, we will launch our fashion-meets-function line of hybrid performance eyewear.

Marchon
Mark Ginsberg, senior vice president of global marketing

WHAT’S IN

• Bold shapes.
• Gorgeous color combinations. The Valentino Camo butterfly style in green is amazing.
• Sumptuous material. Eighties granite details pop on Salvatore Ferragamo’s vintage styles, while DVF chain details look effortless on the face.

WHAT’S OUT

• Giant logo treatments.
• “Applied” decorations.

WHAT’S NEXT

• Wearable technology.
• Stealth branding.
• Integrated hardware.

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