Anakiri’s BioEnergetic skin care line.

NEW YORK — In an industry that promotes positive energy, Anakiri BioEnergetic Skin Care is introducing a new kind of energy altogether, having created a spa collection with a bioenergetic approach to skin care. While at first blush the concept...

NEW YORK — In an industry that promotes positive energy, Anakiri BioEnergetic Skin Care is introducing a new kind of energy altogether, having created a spa collection with a bioenergetic approach to skin care. While at first blush the concept may seem outrageously complex, its entrance coincides with the evolution of spas into wellness centers, offering everything from facials to fertility programs. Anakiri’s president and founder, Erich Worster, credits what he calls “the breakdown of the health care industry” for bolstering the spa business, ushering in the wellness movement and making the timing right for a bioenergetic take on things.

In layman’s terms, bioenergy assists the skin’s ability to repair itself by removing toxins and dirt and clearing room for beneficial substances, such as water and vitamins and minerals.

For those still left scratching their heads, the line is organized into a three-step regimen of cleanse, tone and moisturize. Of course, for those well versed in homeopathy and aromatherapy, or those willing to seek the advice of an aesthetician, additional steps — tone and balance — can be added.

Since debuting last November, Anakiri — comprising 55 stockkeeping units — has rolled out to some 15 to 20 spas, including Vail Cascade Resort & Spa, in Vail, Colo., and The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island, N.C. Having spent the last 10 months trying to educate spas and their clientele about the validity of bioenergetic skin care, Worster noted the concept is catching on. He hopes to have his products in 75 spa doors by the end of 2005.

Worster, former president of the U.S. division of Jurlique, explained the products are designed to be “carriers of vibration,” and utilize principles of homeopathy, flower essences, aromatherapy and acupuncture. Even with all this attention to bioenergy, Anakiri also addresses biochemical benefits like antiaging, he said.

The line, which Worster anticipates will generate $1.2 million in sales its first year, includes several unique items such as Water Essence, a cleanser infused with essential oils and plant phospholipids, and Hydra Tone, a supplement that when mixed with water is said to help the body absorb more water.

Newer ingredients show promise in antiaging, namely alpha lipoic acid, a superpowered antioxidant, and MSM, a bio-available form of sulphur. Both are ingredients in Transformation Eye & Neck Serum, a product that promises to tighten and nourish the delicate tissue around the eyes and neck. Renewal Night Cream also features alpha lipoic acid and bio-available sulphur, which if not formulated correctly can smell, well, like sulphur.

This story first appeared in the September 10, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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Worster commented that the company’s ability to use these powerful ingredients in its products, which all have pleasant scents with no hint of sulphur, distinguishes Anakiri from other premium spa lines.

Having spent 12 years working in the spa industry, Worster said he noticed a dearth of lines specifically designed for spas and aestheticians. “Most of the products that are in spas either come from the medical industry or the beauty industry. They didn’t, I felt, have the depth that the spa experience is bringing,” Worster said. He added the hyper-growth of the U.S. spa industry — which now generates approximately $11 billion, more money than the golf industry — is an indication that consumers are looking to be nurtured.