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British Beauty Council Outlines Roadmap Toward Inclusivity and Innovation

Key efforts included harnessing the potential of STEM professionals in beauty tech innovation, and doubling down on DE&I and sustainability efforts.

Over the next three years, the British Beauty Council seeks to cultivate an increasingly technologically advanced and inclusive beauty industry. 

In a webinar on Thursday, the nonprofit organization’s chief executive officer Millie Kendall and chief of policy Victoria Brownlie outlined key initiatives the BBCo will undertake to bring forth the progress it is striving toward, highlighting its four newly-established pillars: talent, growth, ESG and policy and influence. 

With more and more consumers seeking personalized beauty experiences, enlisting talent into the beauty industry that will drive innovation in the beauty tech sector will prove crucial to brands’ omnichannel approaches, said the BBCo. 

To fulfill this need, the organization will increase recruitment of professionals with STEM backgrounds in beauty, while also encouraging emerging talent to develop skills in STEM disciplines, which are increasingly proving not only helpful but necessary for beauty brands that seek to thrive in today’s industry. 

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The council also aims to provide a more equitable environment not just for British beauty companies themselves, but also service providers, retailers and salons, by enacting meaningful ESG initiatives. 

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The BBCo seeks to mitigate negative impacts of the beauty industry on people and the planet by supporting efforts toward net-zero carbon emissions, and also fortify the efforts of its DE&I committee to meet the needs of marginalized consumers who are often overlooked by the industry. 

The council plans to release a diversity report on the state of the British beauty industry later this year.  

Additionally, the organization will push for policy change when it comes to unregulated cosmetic procedures, stating that while crack downs have been made by the British government in recent years, there is more work to be done in strengthening licensing laws when it comes to aesthetic treatments. 

The roadmap Kendall and Brownlie outlined builds on the organization’s 2021 efforts to support beauty businesses during COVID-19 and Brexit, lobby support through international investment and open up channels for recruitment in beauty. 

“The beauty industry has the ability to change lives and transform Britain’s economic and social fabric,” said Kendall in a statement. 

 

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