Dr. Wu’s products.

NEW YORK — The dermatologist beauty brand trend continues. Its newest proponent, Los Angeles-based Dr. Jessica Wu, has an eponymous range that blends Asian plant extracts with Western technology.<BR><BR>“I wanted to develop a line that...

NEW YORK — The dermatologist beauty brand trend continues. Its newest proponent, Los Angeles-based Dr. Jessica Wu, has an eponymous range that blends Asian plant extracts with Western technology.

“I wanted to develop a line that incorporated Asian botanical ingredients in a scientific manner,” said Wu, a Harvard-trained physician who worked on the formulations with her chemist sister. “I know my customer because I am my customer. I know what I want in an eye cream and a cleanser, and I know that many women wanted a line that was both cosmeceutical and prestige. Not everyone wants a purely clinical line.”

The seven-stockkeeping-unit Dr. Jessica Wu Cosmeceuticals line features a brightening complex; an eye contour cream; a moisturizing face cream; an SPF 32 sunscreen; a heel, elbow and cuticle cream, and two facial cleaners, one gel-based and the other cream-based. Prices range from $40 for the Gentle Foaming Cleanser to $145 for the Anti-Aging Brightening Complex.

The products debuted at Apothia at Fred Segal in Los Angeles in mid-August and rolled out this month to Stanley Korshak in Dallas and Planet Blue in Malibu, Calif. They will be featured in the Bliss catalogue in November, and will bow at Henri Bendel in January. They’re also sold online, at drjessicawu.com.

Industry sources estimate the line could generate $1.2 million in first-year retail sales.

The products mix familiar cosmetic ingredients such as glycolic, kojic and hyaluronic acids with botanical extracts of Chinese white peony, an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, and scutellaria, an antioxidant that promotes the formation of collagen. The brightening complex also contains emblica, an Indian herb that acts to lighten the skin.

“This line joins two parts of my personality — the scientific-nerd part and the fashion- and beauty-loving part,” said Dr. Wu, who applied her creative side to the packaging, which uses a silver font and a Chinese lacquer-inspired shade of deep red.

— Jackie Cooperman

This story first appeared in the October 8, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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