Aptar dupont

As part of an “ongoing” collaboration with DuPont Performance Materials, dispensing systems supplier Aptar said it is transitioning to DuPont’s Crastin polymer material especially designed for the company’s manufactured cosmetic pumps. The announcement was made ahead of the MakeUp in Paris Show, which runs today and Friday.

DuPont said it will be showcasing Crastin at the trade show.

Aptar is using the material for its “Aura” cosmetic pump. DuPont described Crastin as “a high-performance and chemical-resistant polymer that offers significant added value to the technical process of developing cosmetics pumps for creams, foundations and liquid makeup.”

The companies noted Crastin has the capacity to provide “enhanced stability throughout the different cycles of the injection molding process. Securing stability of the injection molding process has been a challenge to the industry, especially as the parameters of the injection machine can shift over time.” Aptar and DuPont said that the “dimensional and mechanical properties of [the Crastin polymer] mitigates this problem. In a similar vein, Crastin [polymer] contributes to increased stability of the different pieces of the pump and ensures consistency of dimensions.”

Alexandra Fabbro, the marketing development leader for performance materials at DuPont for Europe, Asia and the Middle East, said the company has “an excellent, ongoing collaboration with Aptar, which is based on a shared philosophy of open-mindedness and combining competences. This has driven us in the right direction to solve a complex problem around the processability and formation of their pumps.”

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Thomas Clemence, engineer in materials at Aptar, said the collaboration with DuPont involved working together to “get to the bottom of the processing challenges we had been experiencing. This helped us to address the challenge at its core and to find an effective and sustainable solution. DuPont understands our challenges and has a hands-on philosophy.”

Other benefits of Crastin include resolving the formation of “sink marks,” which DuPont described as the “small dimples or grooves on plastic surfaces that occur when, for instance, the hold pressure time is insufficient, the temperature is too high or the cooling time too low.” DuPont said the different grades of Crastin offered to the market meet current regulations in the cosmetic and food industries.

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