Reception at Ever/Body

Millennials are showing interest in noninvasive cosmetic procedures — think Botox, Emsculpt and microneedling — and a former Lauder executive, backed by VC funding, has just the place for them to get work done.

Ever/Body, posited as a Millennial take on the stuffy Upper East Side cosmetic derm’s office, is set to open this week with a flagship storefront in a retail-heavy area of SoHo. The concept is part modern med-spa meets wellness clinic, offering a menu of no-downtime noninvasive services that run the gamut from tame (microcurrent) to high-tech (lasers, IPL, injectables).

Services are booked online, and for that matter, Ever/Body is “entirely tech-enabled,” according to cofounder and chief executive officer Kate Twist, a former global marketing and digital executive at Clinique and Xcel Brands. An online evaluation is available for customers who are unsure of which services are best for them, and existing clients can track progress over time via photos housed on the brand’s web site.

The brand is launching after a raising $17 million in funding, including a Series A round of financing, led by Acme Capital and with additional funding from Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners and Redesign Health. Strategic investors include Warby Parker founders Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa, Rent the Runway and Jetblack founder Jenny Fleiss, Harry’s and Warby Parker cofounder Jeff Raider and Allbirds founder Joey Zwillinger.

“We did tons of consumer research, following this hunch we had, [with the goal of] demystifying this category that has been opaque and confusing,” said Twist, referring to cosmetic dermatology treatments. The hunch Twist is talking about about is the idea that while Millennials are increasingly showing interest in noninvasive cosmetic procedures like Botox and lasers (Botulinum Toxin use among Millennials ages 19 to 34 jumped 87 percent between 2011 and 2016, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery), many of them were confused about where to start and where to go.

Twist and her team even went so far as to accompany consumers they were studying to dermatologist visits, tracking what they did and didn’t like about the process.

“They want it faster, more intuitive and personalized,” said Twist. Plus, Ever/Body is “more convenient and relaxing than a doctor’s office…[it] exists and fits into people’s lives in a more modern way.”

A treatment pod at Ever/Body.  Nadav Havakook

Ever/Body’s SoHo location, at 453 West Broadway, is overseen by a dermatologist and staffed by nurse practitioners, but looks nothing like a doctor’s office. The full-service menu includes injectable treatments, line and wrinkle relaxers, dermal fillers, a microcurrent and microdermabrasion facial, an IPL facial, a Clear + Brilliant laser facial, Emsculpt, PRP and laser hair removal. Injectables are priced by the session — $275 for a 45-minute session of micro-dosed neuromodulators, and $850 for a filler session. A Clear + Brilliant treatment is $495 and Emsculpt, a body contouring treatment using electro magnetic energy, is $1,000. A 15 percent off discount is available for members of Ever/Body — a membership is priced at $39.

The treatments are designed to leave a “natural” look in less than 60 minutes, said Twist, who said her customers are likely those who consider taking care of skin as part of their “holistic approach to beauty.” “My favorite quote from our consumer research is from this woman who said, ‘I’m freaky about health and wellness, I only eat organic, but I get Botox,'” said Twist.

Ever/Body is joining a growing contingent of fast facial bars such as Heyday and Face Haus, though its offerings are far more clinical.

A retail component includes brands such as Skinceuticals, Supergoop and Kosas.

The business is built to scale, said Twist. Instead of a traditional retail buildout, Ever/Body’s treatment rooms are built off-site as mobile “pods” and can be packed up and moved easily to a different location if needed. Twist said the pods were configured with pop-ups and temporary spaces in mind. “We could easily open ten more locations [in a year],” said Twist, who noted that two more permanent spaces are planned for Manhattan by the end of the year.

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