Skip to main content

Follain Teams With Fivestory on Clean Beauty Pop-up

The clean beauty retailer will bring brands such as RMS Beauty, Vintner's Daughter, Josh Rosebrook and more to the luxury boutique.

Follain is setting up shop at Fivestory.

The clean beauty retailer has linked with the luxury goods boutique on a two-room, 1,200-square-foot pop-up shop that comprises Fivestory’s entire third floor. The space houses 200 of the clean beauty products Follain sells on its web site and retail stores, from about 50 brands, including Vintner’s Daughter, Josh Rosebrook, True Botanicals, RMS Beauty and more. It opens on Oct. 19 and will run through the end of January.

The pop-up was born out of Fivestory owner Claire Distenfeld’s own entry into the natural beauty space. About two years ago, she told WWD, she rid her food and beauty routine of “toxic ingredients.” She found Follain, which aside from its e-commerce site operates two stores in Boston and a seasonal pop-up on Nantucket, Mass., through a friend’s recommendation. “I was very overwhelmed and found that people were throwing around terms like ‘natural’ and ‘organic…[at Follain] there was a sense of ease, like the work had been done for me.”

Prior to Follain, Distenfeld has brought beauty to Fivestory. “We never had the space or the expertise in beauty — I easily could have put in my top 10 brands in the store, but it wasn’t the right time,” she said.

You May Also Like

Then last year Distenfeld was invited to a Follain dinner and met the store’s founder, Tara Foley.

“We realized we had similar missions — at the end of the day, we’re curators,” Distenfeld said. “We want to give people the best of the best and I said, ‘We’re opening the [third] floor, it feels right to bring you in.”

The space is divided into two main rooms — one for makeup, where customers can receive lessons or applications from Distenfeld’s personal makeup artist, Dani Levi, and another room that highlights skin care and bath and body. The skin-care room’s pièce de résistance is a bathtub, meant to signify self care.

Distenfeld and Foley designed the space to be experiential, with educational components placed throughout the rooms.

“We realized these products work best when shared with tips and tricks — women love sharing with each other,” Foley said. Follain runs a program where customers can come to the store or consult with a sales associate online or via text and can swap out their conventional products for clean ones. Foley plans to tap into this as Fivestory, as well as run both private and public events to educate the shopper on clean beauty.

“The luxury shopper is extraordinarily smart and educated and getting smarter by the minute — they’re starting to ask questions about the products they’ve used forever,” Distenfeld said. “One aspect of our customer that we love is curiosity — we want to give her more experiences, teach her more and give her that 360-degree lifestyle perspective. We know the customer is going to love learning about clean beauty.”