Processed with MOLDIV

Cover Girl is getting a boost in the lip department, thanks to influencer Jazmina Daniel.

Known on Instagram as @missjazminad to her 1.2 million followers, Daniel has been chosen as a member of the Coty Inc.-owned brand’s Cover Girl Collective, a group of influencers that includes male makeup artist James Charles and Nura Afia, an American beauty vlogger who wears a hijab . She’s been tasked with conceiving new creative content around Cover Girl lip products to use on social media and she’ll also play a hand in product and campaign development.

Daniel shot to Insta-fame after the intricate designs she creates with makeup on her own lips went viral — recent posts include a mini-portrait of Rihanna from the pop star’s “Wild Thoughts” music video, as well as a tiny reproduction of Audrey Hepburn’s “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” movie poster, complete with a Tiffany blue backdrop.

“Jazmina is fierce. She is an artist and creator unafraid to experiment with makeup, but at the same time, does so with such incredible technique,” said Ukonwa Ojo, senior vice president of Cover Girl. “She will develop beautiful and inspiring creative for social, inspiring people with the many possibilities of looks you can achieve with Cover Girl.”

You May Also Like

The Australian-born influencer, who recently relocated to Los Angeles, got her start in lip art after being diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2006 at the age of 14, a fact she doesn’t shy away from sharing on social media. Here, she talks about her willingness to be open online, the tools one needs to create a Beyoncé portrait on the lips (a magnifying mirror is a must), and why she hasn’t given up Snapchat for Instagram stories.

Jazmina Daniels' first lip look for Cover Girl.

Jazmina Daniels’ first lip look for Cover Girl. 

WWD: What is your favorite social media platform?

Jazmina Daniel: Definitely Instagram, because it was the first platform I used to showcase [my work] and I developed a great following — they really push me to keep creating and sharing what I love. I use Twitter, YouTube, Snapchat…I find I can get even more personal on Snapchat and share a quick makeup tutorial. If I’m doing a Snap tutorial I’ll post it on Instagram as well, but I think a lot of people still want to use Snapchat — [for me], using both equally as much is good.

WWD: What gets the most engagement?

J.D.: It would definitely have to be my more intricate lip art, especially when I’ve tried to make something really tiny. It all comes down to catching people’s attention as they’re scrolling through their feeds. I did a Beyoncé lip art that got a lot of attention — I actually drew her pregnancy shoot on my lip. When I make intricate designs like that, I definitely need a magnifying mirror so I can get the details right. I always try to find the smallest brushes for those details — nail art brushes I find to be the best, but I’ve used pins and toothpicks. That took so long, like six or seven hours. Everyone’s a fan of Beyoncé. People went really crazy for that.

WWD: What is the first thing you check in the morning and the last thing you check at night?

J.D.: I go on Instagram morning and night. The minute I wake up, I check what I missed, reply to comments and ‘like’ people’s work. I’ll go on Twitter as well and see what people are feeling, what people are complaining about and then I’ll go on Snapchat and see what’s happening there. The minute I’m in bed, I’m scrolling through Instagram again — it’s just a habit.

WWD: What inspires you?

J.D.: Painters and drawing on social media, nail art, but even just going outside and looking at the different colors of the trees and flowers. I’ve dedicated lip art to movies I love — “The Little Mermaid,” “Harry Potter.”

WWD: Who do you follow?

J.D.: Mostly the people I follow are beauty influencers that inspire me, but I follow a lot of painters, tattoo artists and nail artists. I love using nails [as inspiration]. There’s a great nail account @nail_wolf, she does amazing gel nails with crazy designs and art. I love to follow anyone that steps out of the box.

WWD: What’s the most challenging aspect of creating content?

J.D.: I never want to plateau — I’m always trying to do better and bolder things.

WWD: In terms of beauty — where do you fall on the “maintenance” scale? What are the products you can’t live without?

J.D.: I love to be full coverage — bold lashes and bold lipstick even if I’m just going to the shops. But I also love to keep my face bare with just lip balm and mascara. It depends on my mood. I wouldn’t call myself high maintenance because I don’t think there should be [a negative connotation in] in wanting to wear a lot of makeup or spend time creating a different look. That’s the good thing about makeup — you can change how you want to look and feel every day if you want to.

WWD: Where do you like to shop for clothes?

J.D.: I’ll sometimes switch it up — I might go for a pin-up look. But it depends what makeup I wear and I’ll try to match it to my mood. My favorite online place is Asos because they have bold patterns and the pricing is great.

WWD: What is you most expensive beauty indulgence?

J.D.: I love a good facial. I try and have one at least once a month because I’m always doing makeup — it’s good to clean your skin and have it feel fresh and glowing. That’s my biggest monthly expense. And I always take my makeup off at night. I never leave it on — I just know what it does to your skin. I’m always trying to find new skin-care products as well. I don’t think we should use the same routine [all the time] because our bodies get used to it.

WWD: How do you decide what to share on social media and what to keep private?

J.D: I like to think I’m pretty open online with my followers. Social media has given me so much — I met my girlfriend through social media. We met on Instagram through a friend. I get a lot of people messaging me telling me I inspire them, and I get people tagging me on looks [of mine] that they’ve tried to re-create — it’s not even just talking about makeup, even the fact that I’ve had a brain tumor…people have contacted me with similar situations about their mom or dad or sister and I talk to them about my experience. It’s good to be open about it if you can help people.

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus